Latin American Folktales: Stories from Hispanic and Indian Traditions

Latin American Folktales Stories from Hispanic and Indian Traditions The wisdom and artistry of Latin America s storytellers preserve one of the world s richest folktale traditions combining the lore of medieval Europe the ancient Near East and pre Columbian America

  • Title: Latin American Folktales: Stories from Hispanic and Indian Traditions
  • Author: John Bierhorst
  • ISBN: 9780375714399
  • Page: 227
  • Format: Paperback
  • The wisdom and artistry of Latin America s storytellers preserve one of the world s richest folktale traditions combining the lore of medieval Europe, the ancient Near East, and pre Columbian America Among the essential characters are the quiet man s wife who knew the Devil s secrets, the three daughters who robbed their father s grave, and the wife in disguise who marrieThe wisdom and artistry of Latin America s storytellers preserve one of the world s richest folktale traditions combining the lore of medieval Europe, the ancient Near East, and pre Columbian America Among the essential characters are the quiet man s wife who knew the Devil s secrets, the three daughters who robbed their father s grave, and the wife in disguise who married her own husband not to mention the Bear s son, the tricksters Fox and Monkey, the two compadres, and the classic rogue Pedro de Urdemalas.Gathered from twenty countries, including the United States, the stories are brought together here in a core collection of one hundred tales arranged in the form of a velorio, or wake, the most frequent occasion for public storytelling The tales are preceded by a selection of early Colonial legends foreshadowing the themes of Latino folklore and are followed by a carefully chosen group of modern Indian myths that replay the basic stories in a contrasting key Riddles, chain riddles, and folk prayers, part and parcel of the velorio along with folktales, are introduced at appropriate junctures.The collection is unprecedented in size and scope, and most of the tales have not been translated into English before The result is the first panoramic anthology of Hispano American folk narratives in any language.Part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library

    One thought on “Latin American Folktales: Stories from Hispanic and Indian Traditions”

    1. The Spanish edition is definitely worth getting. The stories are obviously more vibrant in the original language -- and many are written down here in the criollo dialect. A great way for Spanish-language students to get used to "folk speech," since the language is still fairly simple.These tales weren't creatures of the page. They were meant to be listened to. And the Spanish edition preserves a lot of that old "music."Especially enjoyed the tales from northern New Mexico, where you'll see archa [...]

    2. One of the stories in this book featured a king who told his wife, “I’d know you even if you’d been turned into corn soup.” This resulted in some confusion from the reading audience (ie, me). I have known (and eaten) many corn soups in my life, but none of them has had even vaguely humanoid qualities – at least, that I could recognize. Therefore, I issue this warning to friends, family, and acquaintances: if you are turned into corn soup, don’t count on me to figure it out.

    3. For a relatively small book, this is chock-full of short folktales. There are two time periods represented, la epoca virreinal, and the 20th century, and the introduction explains the large gap between the periods and the noticeable changes in themes and styles between the two. Both the name of the storyteller and region (country, culture, etc) are noted when available. The indices are also quite helpful, with a notes section, glossary, and a directory dividing the stories by genre and themes.

    4. This is a decent compilation of folktales from Latin America, but most of them are REALLY short. That can be a good thing or a bad thing -- it makes them easy to read, but sometimes I found myself in a pattern of just reading as fast as I could because they were so quick. There wasn't enough time to really dig into them. One interesting thing was comparing these stories to other folk-/fairytales I've read. There were a LOT of stories that were similar to ones in 1001 Arabian Nights (or whatever [...]

    5. Ahh, the perils of e-reading. Wish I'd read the notes simultaneously, they are super informative and I found myself wishing for more context as I made my way through the stories without their benefit.

    6. Some good, colorful stories. You can't beat fairy tales and short stories for a good read, and it has a good Latin American flavor.

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