Wallis & Edward Letters 1931-37: The Intimate Correspondence of the Duke & Duchess of Windsor

Wallis Edward Letters The Intimate Correspondence of the Duke Duchess of Windsor In January Wallis Simpson the American wife of a conventional London businessman realized the daydream of every middle class woman in England in the course a weekend country house party in the

  • Title: Wallis & Edward Letters 1931-37: The Intimate Correspondence of the Duke & Duchess of Windsor
  • Author: Edward Windsor Wallis Warfield Windsor Michael Bloch
  • ISBN: 9780671612092
  • Page: 494
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In January 1931, Wallis Simpson, the American wife of a conventional London businessman, realized the daydream of every middle class woman in England in the course a weekend country house party in the English Midlands, she was introduced socially to the great idol of the day, Edward Prince of Wales This book relates the most celebrated love story of modern times that oIn January 1931, Wallis Simpson, the American wife of a conventional London businessman, realized the daydream of every middle class woman in England in the course a weekend country house party in the English Midlands, she was introduced socially to the great idol of the day, Edward Prince of Wales This book relates the most celebrated love story of modern times that of Wallis Simpson nee Warfield of Balti, later the Duchess of Windsor, and Prince of Wales, Edward VIII of England to be.

    One thought on “Wallis & Edward Letters 1931-37: The Intimate Correspondence of the Duke & Duchess of Windsor”

    1. Consisting of many letters written by Wallis Simpson to her Aunt Bessie while Wallis was living in London with her second husband, Ernest Simpson, this book gives a fascinating peek into Wallis' everyday life before she met the (then) Prince of Wales. The letters could be from any lady of her class and social position at that time, but the fact that it's Wallis makes them even more interesting. She becomes "Wallis in Wonderland" as the Simpsons' social life brings them more and more into contact [...]

    2. I give this book five stars only because its editor, Michael Blogh, did what he was supposed to do: compile the personal correspondence of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor and publish it for us mere mortals to peruse. Through her correspondence, Wallis revealed herself to be cold-natured, flippant, bossy, self-absorbed, and a very small person mentally - she obsessed over servants, was never satisfied with servants, was constantly on holiday in some exotic locale and complaining that it wasn't He [...]

    3. This sure cast a more accurate light on the Duchess of Windsor. Apparently she wanted these letters published after her death so people wouldn't continue to see her in a negative light. However, I'm not sure how she thought she would be portrayed with these, because she comes across as a money hungry ogre. There has been so much controversy surrounding the relationship between her and the Duke of Windsor, and this cleared things up for me. She came across as strong, sharp, quick, calculating, an [...]

    4. A collection of unique, somewhat peculiar letters written by Edward Windsor and Wallis Simpson during their infamous courtship. The full details of their behavior and their romantic situation are not investigated in the brief texts that explain the events that surround these letters but OH THESE LETTERS.The Edward/Wallis letters are fascinating for the baby-talk in which they were expressed-- more than a little excessive for two lovers in their 40s. The Wallis letters to her Aunt Bessie are fasc [...]

    5. I read this because of a scene with the Prince of Wales in Downton Abbey, so I got curious about this king that abdicated his throne and found there wasn't a lot out there about him. I had to order this used hard cover book to find out a bit more about this love story. And it is mundane and beautiful, ordinary and completely surreal. I really liked how they set the stage with the letters Wallis writes home leading up to meeting Edward (David) and then how the letters slowly shift in tone and the [...]

    6. Something about people sharing their lives freely, knowing that no one but the person they are writing to will ever read it, is so much more interesting than their subsequent autobiographies or memoirs. Even the most mundane things such as the popular cooking recipes in 1930s Great Britain (I had to look up the word "pop-over rings" to learn that's what "muffins" used to be made in), the popular shades of silk stockings (better quality in the US!), the proper way and season to clean drapes in th [...]

    7. I've been fascinated by the story of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor for a long time. It was incredible to read their personal letters and to get a peek at their thoughts as this drama unfolded. Their letters to each other aren't quite what I imagined, the Duke comes across as more immature and more needy than the suave, worldly gentleman I had always imagined him to be. Nevertheless this romance was truly one for the ages, and Wallis and Edward will always hold a special place in my heart.

    8. This was the first reading I've ever done on this liaison powerful enough to cause a King to give up his kingdom, and unfortunately, I was not able to glean much insight into the plot or the characters from the letters of Wallis. They were largely matter-of-fact, expressed little opinion, and revealed very little of the inner workings of Wallis. The same goes for the Edward's letters. Perhaps this book would serve as a good companion to some larger biographical tome.

    9. This was a very interesting book of letters written by Wallis Simpson to her aunt, but also contains letters written between her and her future husband Edward, Prince of Wales, from their first meeting until several weeks before their wedding. There is also information interspersed between the letters that is from their separate memoirs, as well. Fascinating.

    10. I've read so much about this couple. This is not really going to be a review because I'm pressed for time right now. However, I'll say that this book was probably written for people who already have a lot of background info on Wallis Simpson & Edward. That has no effect on my rating this 4 stars, though.

    11. Curious, fascinating and tedious all at the same time. This book provided insight into the progression of the romance between Wallis Simpson and Edward, Prince of Wales. Wallis Simpson certainly presented herself as a whining social climber who appeared to have only one destination in mind for herself. I hope they were happy together.

    12. One feels she got to know the Duchess better by reading her letters. One also sees what a puppy dog the Duke was. After reading so much about them, I see they were quite well matched: "e Prince yearned for a mother's sympathetic attentions" and, as for the Southern-born Wallis, "she had been taught to cherish and look after her man." I loved this book.

    13. By turns fascinating and boring, this is certainly a unique perspective on the abdication of Edward VIII. The ending leaves much to be desired, however, as it gives no information on the marriage of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. Literallyt a detail to be had.

    14. Best. Love story. Ever.Edward gave up everything for the woman he loved- back in this time it was unheard of that British royalty would give up the throne to marry a woman (an American divorcee none the less) because he was in love with her.

    15. I think this book is wonderful for all those who really want to understand what has happened between the future Duke and the Duchess of Windsor. Knowing the story from their point of view is a unique opportunity to understand why Edward has abdicated and what life was like afterwards for them.

    16. I couldn't get passed the first group of photos. Just lost interest. I was hoping for a more interesting story here.The book was edited and compiled well, I just didn't find Wallis' situation as captivating as I thought it would be.

    17. I love reading books in letter form and this one is very good. He really loved her. I had heard their story but not in this much detail. A very good read.

    18. Good read if you want to see how the Duchess of Windsor REALLY was - not the "poor her, they didn't let her be Queen" crap you can read.

    19. A fascinating view of these lives from the inside out. If you're not familiar with the story of King Edward's abdication, I suggest you become familiar with this first.

    20. Excellent primary sources. Really gives you a glimpse into their lives, first hand, without anyone's interpretations. For better or worse.

    21. See what all the fuss was about. Two incredibly shallow people and an entire country that dodged a bullet.

    22. After seeing "The King's Speech" I wanted to learn more about Wallis and Edward. This book gave me a taste of what they were about and what life was like for them.

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