Homeplace

Homeplace Librarian s note An alternate cover edition can be found hereAfter twenty one years Micah Mike Winship is making the big move she s going home for a visit She hasn t been back since when her fat

  • Title: Homeplace
  • Author: Anne Rivers Siddons
  • ISBN: 9780061011412
  • Page: 117
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Librarian s note An alternate cover edition can be found hereAfter twenty one years Micah Mike Winship is making the big move she s going home for a visit She hasn t been back since 1963, when her father threw her out, but now he is dying and asking for her And although she is armed with her succesful journalism career and the strength found after her divorce, she isLibrarian s note An alternate cover edition can be found hereAfter twenty one years Micah Mike Winship is making the big move she s going home for a visit She hasn t been back since 1963, when her father threw her out, but now he is dying and asking for her And although she is armed with her succesful journalism career and the strength found after her divorce, she is nearing forty and her sophisticated urban lifestyle is falling apart.Heading home, Mike is unprepared for a past that has lain in wait for her one that includes an old love, a spoiled sister, and a plot to seize her family s land And in trying to understand her long forgotten self, she learns at last those lessons best learned early about love and loss, family and forgiveness, and the undeniable need for a place called home.

    One thought on “Homeplace”

    1. This book was such a disappointment. I really couldn't tell who we were supposed to be rooting for; the characters were all equally deplorable. *spoilers*. I find it hard to empathize with a main character who is so busy having an affair in Georgia that her twelve year old daughter (living with her irresponsible father in California) rarely crosses her mind. In fact, she only speaks to her once during her entire summer in Georgia. And I guess we are supposed to feel sorrow when the crotchety old [...]

    2. 56% of the way through Anne Rivers Siddons’ Homeplace I realized that I really don’t care what happens to any of these characters anymore. I found I was not convinced of their motivations for doing what they did, I was not in sympathy with their flaws and foibles, and I just plain didn’t like any of them. I wasn't even given those characters you love to hate, I just didn’t give a flip about these people and whether they lived or died. The book started out well. In fact it was very simila [...]

    3. Homeplace is set in the fictional town of Lytton, Georgia, and hits on some very controversial subjects for Siddons. She goes back to the Civil Rights era where the main character Mike meets the wrath of her father when she skips school to attend a rally in Atlanta. This turning point in the novel becomes the pivoting event. Mike leaves home and attempts to find her way on her own, and she’s a successful journalist. But, as all things that are swept under carpets, the dust eventually rises and [...]

    4. Homeplace is my favorite ARS book so far. Unlike some of the other books that had strange endings, this one was reasonable and hopeful, not ridiculous, over the top, or reaching.I also loved the start where Micah Winship "Mike" is shown as a lonely child who preferred the company of the servants than her own father. As the story unfolds, we find that Mike's father never accepted her because he blamed her for causing the death of his beloved wife in childbirth.Mike is now an insecure and rather g [...]

    5. I'm a bit over half way through this book. I've now read a number of her books and I see some repetition in characters (their traits and descriptions) and themes.I had decided to read some mid-level novels, set in fairly contemporary period, as a switch from my usual fare of mysteries and classics (with the occasional non-fiction title). I wanted narrative drive, good story telling, and emotionally gripping. Russo, Conroy and Siddons are the authors I've read so far. As a Southerner, I do enjoy [...]

    6. One of Siddon's earlier books. Could have been much better if not for the ROMANCE NOVEL screaming out at us - ohmygoodness, it is so gross - and her distaste for the slightest amount of extra fat on anyone. I'm wondering if the author is or was anorexic? Her descriptions of the fat lady are horrid and mean, and even worse, most old people are "turkey necks," have "carved blue hair," and the like. Church is musty, old, and mostly irrelevant, unless one needs it for a funeral, of course. Then the [...]

    7. the story overall wasenjoyable and kept my interest and most if tge characters were well developed, except the important ones such as the father whom this all revolved around. i figured out the ending about half way through, in other words the plot took predictable turns . (SPOILER ALERT) I could not relate the self absorbed main character. Having cared for sick loved ones before I can say I don't beieve anyone could be so heartless and wreckless as to not hear their loved one screaming in pain [...]

    8. A decent read, but not one of my favorites by this author. It picked up at the end, but Mike was just so unlikeable throughout most of the book, it was hard to sympathize. And I thought the apparent distaste for overweight people was a bit unnecessary.A bit disappointed in this one, but ARS is one of my favorites, so I'll chalk it up as an anomaly.

    9. I started to read Anne Rivers Siddons books in the order they were writtenis is the 4th. The same "characters" have shown up in these first 4 books. I enjoyed this bookbut found myself looking for the familiar themes and characters.

    10. One of the most boring books I've read in a long time. I made it to page 80 and cut my losses. This was the first book I've read by this author and probably won't start any others by her.

    11. I always like Siddons, some more than others, but I like the way she develops her characters, and her psychological insights into what molds and drives them.

    12. I thought this was something different than it was. I was disappointed. I thought the main charracter was very mean and small minded.

    13. Initially this book reminded me of To Kill a Mockingbird, but then the plot goes on. Mike has returned home and taken up with her former lover from many years ago, Bayard Sewell. That can't last and they both know it. She is frustrated that her older sister, Dee Dee, who half raised her, is so pricklish with her. And then there is Sam, who is her Father's lawyer and part-time care giver. I was disappointed that Mike doesn't considered going to California and getting her twelve year old daughter [...]

    14. I have read most of ARS's books, and usually enjoyed them. Homeplace was not one of my favorites. I didn't like most of the characters, and found them to be mean spirited. I don't stop reading a book once I have started it, but I was glad when this one was over!

    15. Girl returns home to GA after her father threw her out 21 years ago but he is dying now and asked for her back. Love entanglements ensue as well as will surprises.

    16. Micah Winship's birth brought the death of her mother, something her father could never get passed. She grew up unloved by all but the negro help. Her older sister Dee Dee tried to be a mother to her but they really did not understand one another. In High School Micah meets a new student - Bayless. He and his mom are very poor. The Winship's are fairly well off. The story takes place during the turbulent Civil Rights Area in the 60's and later. Micah believes in equality, her father and the town [...]

    17. It seems that my admiration for Anne Rivers Siddons novels is waning. I adore Colony and Outer Banks, but something about her other novels is seriously irritating me. Homeplace started out as another such novel.Mike is a reporter who fled her father's home in Georgia after he cursed her out for attending a civil right rally. He had never loved her, or so she believed, because her mother died soon after giving birth and her father never forgave her the sin. He sister, Daisy, was the golden child, [...]

    18. I'm revisiting some of my favorite authors and Anne Rivers Siddons is one of my all-time favorites. She's the one who got me to start reading everything written by a particular author. Anyway, I read this when printed (1987) and probably really enjoyed it. This reading (age 66) I was a bit more critical, and while I liked it quite a lot, found that she has other books out that are better! Her characters still engage me, however, and I always wish to know how things will turn out for them. There [...]

    19. The author mentions Yma Sumac on p. 45 (large print edition). I read this book after reading Peachtree Road. The prose is equally enjoyable, and the characters are described beautifully. The only thing that pushed Peachtree Road from a “5” to an “8” was my personal interest in the Buckhead locale. This book did not have that, and so I give it only a 5. The central theme of this book is the recovery of the love that Mike had for her father. After the despicable things that he had said to [...]

    20. Another story of angst between father and daughter. Micah (Mike) Winship Singer is at a low point in her life. After 21 years away from home with a failed marriage, failed relationship, a literary career that is not going well, a lost NY home and daughter that decides to go live with her father, Micah is summoned back to Lytton GA. Her father is dying. He has cancer and has recently had a stroke and is supposedly asking for her. Micah having no where else to go at the moment puts on her thick sk [...]

    21. After twenty-one years Micah (Mike) Winship is making the big move--she's going home for a visit. She hasn't been back since 1963, when her father threw her out, but now he is dying and asking for her. And although she is armed with her succesful journalism career and the strength found after her divorce, she is nearing forty and her sophisticated urban lifestyle is falling apart.Heading home, Mike is unprepared for a past that has lain in wait for her--one that includes an old love, a spoiled s [...]

    22. I haven't read a Siddons book for years, but she has always been one ofmy favorite southern writers. Picked this book up at a garage sale because after reading the back cover thought I had not read this one.I found the first 20-30 pages hard to connect with, but as I remembered,Ms. Siddons eventually took my hand and wouldn't let go. Finished it intwo days. I don't remember such raw sexuality in the other books I have read but maybe it is because I was younger and didn't find it asunimportant as [...]

    23. It's been a while since I've read an Ann Rivers Siddons book and I'd forgotten how much I enjoy the way she tells a story. This was a wonderful book that totally kept me captivated. I just love when things catch me by surprise in any book and this one had a few that had me scratching my head. Based in the south, but a piece of Yankee since Micah had lived in NYC for so long, it definitely had the southern charm. The dynamics between the characters added to the story and written so well, it was a [...]

    24. Her mother died when Micah, the main character of this story, was born. Her father always resented her for this and she leaves home right after high school and does not return. Twenty years later when this story takes place, Micah's father has asked her to come home and help out while he dies from cancer. I had a really difficult time with the dysfunctional family relationships in this novel - it made me very uncomfortable to read about a father who could treat a daughter this way. However, it d [...]

    25. Another in my recently rediscovered zest for Siddons. The place is familiar but the time is actually more modern and this book deals with the fallout of the Civil Rights movement for one family (and their acquaintenances). Interesting central characters with a variety of odd relationships among them. Gothic and entertaining, just like I like my Southern novels. Has a great resolution and the sense of place is fantastic.

    26. Generally, I love her books. (It's the same with Pat Conroy.) I have always loved the trope of the quirky/dark/complicated child coming home to her tortured/complicated Southern family/town.It was a good read, didn't disappoint. Although I picked out the storyline twists way in advance (who betrays who, who really has the best intentions, etc.), I still enjoyed it.I'm reading my way through favorite authors' backlist titles, so don't be surprised when you see more of her work pop up.

    27. I really had it almost figured out early on. Micah Winship comes home to Georgia; beat down from a failed marriage, another failed relationship, a down sloping career, & a fight with her only daughter, to be confronted with her past: a father who turned her out & her now obese sister with her slimy husband. An old lover cuts to the bone. Not as good as her others, but I won't be able to part with it.

    28. I keep reading Anne Rivers Siddons' books and thinking "oh, that's her best book yet." Homeplace is one of my favorites for sure. There is suspense throughout this book and I really didn't figure it out exactly until the end, which is unusual and good. I thoroughly enjoyed and understood the character of Mike. Great book.

    29. It's been a looooong time since I've read a book that necessitated the use of a dictionary, but that did not bother me one bit with this story. I think the story and the characters were well developed. It reminded me that people are often so much more than what they seem, and that more often than not, we are blinded to that with those that we are most familiar with.

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