A Thousand Times More Fair: What Shakespeare's Plays Teach Us About Justice

A Thousand Times More Fair What Shakespeare s Plays Teach Us About Justice Fascinating Loaded with perceptive and provocative comments on Shakespeare s plots characters and contemporary analogs Justice John Paul Stevens Supreme Court of the United States Kenji Yoshino is

  • Title: A Thousand Times More Fair: What Shakespeare's Plays Teach Us About Justice
  • Author: Kenji Yoshino
  • ISBN: 9780062087720
  • Page: 267
  • Format: ebook
  • Fascinating.Loaded with perceptive and provocative comments on Shakespeare s plots, characters, and contemporary analogs Justice John Paul Stevens, Supreme Court of the United States Kenji Yoshino is the face and the voice of the new civil rights Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickled and DimedA Thousand Times More Fair is a highly inventive and provocative explorat Fascinating.Loaded with perceptive and provocative comments on Shakespeare s plots, characters, and contemporary analogs Justice John Paul Stevens, Supreme Court of the United States Kenji Yoshino is the face and the voice of the new civil rights Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickled and DimedA Thousand Times More Fair is a highly inventive and provocative exploration of ethics and the law that uses the plays of William Shakespeare as a prism through which to view the nature of justice in our contemporary lives Celebrated law professor and author Kenji Yoshino delves into ten of the most important works of the Immortal Bard of Avon, offering prescient and thought provoking discussions of lawyers, property rights, vengeance legal and otherwise , and restitution that have tremendous significance to the defining events of our times from the O.J Simpson trial to Abu Ghraib Anyone fascinated by important legal and social issues as well as fans of Shakespeare centered bestsellers like Will in the World will find A Thousand Times More Fair an exceptionally rewarding reading experience.

    One thought on “A Thousand Times More Fair: What Shakespeare's Plays Teach Us About Justice”

    1. This is by far one of the best analyses of Shakespeare's works that I have ever read. While I have heard many critics applauding Shakespeare's thorough knowledge of the law, I have never read anything that actually goes through his works and analyzes the uses of trials, judging, and ruling. Instead of looking at Shakespeare through the lenses of deconstruction, gender, new criticism, new historicism, etc Yoshino uses the lens of law and justice. Each chapter focuses on a certain aspect of law, u [...]

    2. Whether you are or are not a lawyer and whether you do or don't know a lot about Shakespeare's plays, Yoshino's book provides insights to both areas. In addition to providing a great deal of information about the several plays he discusses, each selected for a different legal topic, he explores not only how the state of the law and the judicial processes at the relevant times influenced what Shakespeare wrote and the perspective from which he wrote it, but also brings the discussions to bear on [...]

    3. THE LAW PLAYS an unacknowledged role in much of Shakespeare’s work. Trials—real trials, quasi-trials, mock trials—recur. In many plays, characters refer to contemporary laws and legal institutions; and the plays raise larger questions about justice and the workings of the law. Lawyers, then, can help to illuminate Shakespeare’s plays, and many have done so by explaining the early modern legal background and Shakespeare’s exploitation of persistent legal puzzles for dramatic purposes.Re [...]

    4. I enjoyed this on several levels. As a Shakespeare fan, I liked seeing an analysis of a different type than I usually see for, say, Hamlet and Othello. Yoshino also did a good job of explaining the events of plays that I hadn't read clearly enough for me to follow his line of thought, but not spoiling them to the extent that I had no interest in reading them anymore. As a writer, it also gave me another dimension to think about when writing my own stories.

    5. Author's web site: bit/vCh0B2 "Why is the rule of law better than revenge? How much mercy should we show a wrongdoer? What does it mean to "prove" guilt or innocence? As Yoshino argues, a searching examination of Shakespeare's plays–and the many advocates, judges, criminals, and vigilantes who populate them–can elucidate some of the most troubling issues in contemporary life."

    6. I thought Yoshino's Covering was brilliant, providing legitimately fresh insight into civil rights jurisprudence and society. A Thousand Times More Fair confirmed that Yoshino is brilliant and was interesting but not terribly groundbreaking.

    7. Kenji Yoshino's look into Shakespeare's plays reveals the many ways justice was served from Roman times up to the XVII century.Thoughtful and entertaining. Controversial and enlightening. Do not miss.

    8. This book feels like a bad lit dissertation (with little depth and a mechanical methodology) but I can't stop reading it. very weird-sometimes-amusing to watch a lawyer trying cavalier literary analysis.

    9. Yoshino has some interesting insights, but the contemporary applications felt contrived. Shoehorning OJ Simpson's glove into Othello, or Clinton's "meaning of the word is" into Merchant of Venice? Not convincing. I found myself skipping over those sections to read the analyses of the plays themselves. Apart from a dreadful essay on Macbeth, these were mostly worthwhile—though not luminous.

    10. Finished a book my mom got me for Christmas! It belonged to a Chief Justice and is a great book if you're interested in Shakespeare or the law.

    11. I’m a lawyer, and I love Shakespeare. So I enjoyed this book. Yoshino is a law professor and an excellent writer. There is a lot of law in Shakespeare’s plays (see Measure for Measure and Merchant of Venice, especially). Yoshino attempts to draw lessons for today from Shakespeare’s plays. I’m not sure that he succeeds completely, but he sure has a lot of interesting things to say about them. He compares Portia to President Clinton because they both parse words expertly. He also treats Sh [...]

    12. Each chapter of the book is about a play and a lesson about justice to be drawn. Typically, the chapter will apply the lesson to a modern day example. Personally I found the chapters about plays I've already read the most enjoyable, though I did read the others as well. I feel like each lesson is generally easy to grasp. Titus Andronicus is about how without a rule of law embodied by the state revenge cycles spiral out of control, Macbeth is about our yearning for natural justice, and the Henari [...]

    13. I liked several things about Yoshino's book, though ultimately I found the chapter per play approach to be a bit disjointed, and somewhat uneven. In general, I found his chapters about lesser known plays to be more vivid in their connections to contemporary legal questions, and more surprising in their analyses of the plays. While his chapters on the big tragedies seem too general in the lessons they draw, though that's an understandable problem when writing about Hamlet. In contrast, several of [...]

    14. This is probably the book that made me really appreciate Shakespeare. Although the contemporary comparisons felt a little forced at times, I appreciated the unorthodox method of analysis.

    15. Mr. Yoshino was once an English major but decided to pursue law. He found that the two aren’t necessarily incompatible. Using Shakespeare’s plays as his sources, he outlines the connections between various aspects of the law as practiced by the characters in the Bard’s works and how they reflect on modern society. The man reveals his deep love of Shakespeare, his thorough understanding of literature and a firm grounding in the legal system, both past and present.Far from being too dry, “ [...]

    16. Mr. Yoshino was once an English major but decided to pursue law. He found that the two aren’t necessarily incompatible. Using Shakespeare’s plays as his sources, he outlines the connections between various aspects of the law as practiced by the characters in the Bard’s works and how they reflect on modern society. The man reveals his deep love of Shakespeare, his thorough understanding of literature and a firm grounding in the legal system, both past and present. Far from being too dry, [...]

    17. It has been 20 years since I put a book down, unfinished, but that is exactly what I did with "A Thousand Times More Fair". The premise is excellent and Shakespeare is a fitting prism through which to view the law. My complaint is about the Harvard-educated author's complete lack of understanding of the lex talionis and the fact that it is a statement about the punishment fitting the crime, not a statement about revenge. Mr. Yoshino's belief that Christianity trumps Jewish law at all times and i [...]

    18. If you like shakespeare, and are merely looking for a book to read that draws legal analysis from Shakespeare's work then this is a five star work. However, if you are looking to do actual legal analysis in literature, this is a disappointment. The conclusion to be drawn from the merchant of venice that fact-finders are fallible, while maybe a conclusion worth the paper it is printed on in shakespeare's time, hardly seems like it needs illuminating today. Yoshino clearly had a lot of fun writing [...]

    19. I wish there were more books like this one! Intelligently written, but still easy to read. Complicated ideas, but presented in such a down-to-earth fashion that even a simpleton like me could easily inderstand them. Most books about Shakespeare's works are a bore, but this was both entertaining and insightful. He relates each play to a well known current legal situation, such as the war in Iraq or the O.J. Simpson trial. This is definitely one of the best books to focus on a specific theme in Sh [...]

    20. Thoughtful yet brief exploration of different aspects of the notion of "justice" as presented in a number of Shakespeare's plays. Each chapter centers on a play and a particular concept, with a more or less current real life situation in which the same concept can been seen at play. He has some out of the ordinary takes (he's up front about this) on some of the plays, which is cool. Quick reading, law nerdly fun.

    21. A charming exploration of Shakespeare's plays from the point of view of law and justice. Though the book is short on specific applications to today's events (which is not a fault in the book itself but rather in its marketing), Yoshino finds much to say on more general themes, and full of an appealing skepticism and passion and real moral thought.

    22. Great read. lots of fun, some of the middle chapters are less solid than the beginning and ending chapters. Yoshino on the whole does a nice job of weaving Shakespeare and modern law together as a call to recognize our own faults to become more a more beautiful and just.

    23. Useful and interesting commentary on Shakespeare, though the author is occasionally pompous in his opinion of himself.

    24. Though I did not agree with everything the author said, it did change my view on some of the plays and the characters.

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