Lowering Higher Education: The Rise of Corporate Universities and the Fall of Liberal Education

Lowering Higher Education The Rise of Corporate Universities and the Fall of Liberal Education What happens to the liberal arts and science education when universities attempt to sell it as a form of job training In Lowering Higher Education a follow up to their provocative book Ivory Tow

  • Title: Lowering Higher Education: The Rise of Corporate Universities and the Fall of Liberal Education
  • Author: James E. Côté Anton L. Allahar
  • ISBN: 9781442611214
  • Page: 115
  • Format: Paperback
  • What happens to the liberal arts and science education when universities attempt to sell it as a form of job training In Lowering Higher Education, a follow up to their provocative 2007 book Ivory Tower Blues, James E Cote and Anton L Allahar explore the subverted idea of the university and the forces that have set adrift the mission of these institutions Cote and AlWhat happens to the liberal arts and science education when universities attempt to sell it as a form of job training In Lowering Higher Education, a follow up to their provocative 2007 book Ivory Tower Blues, James E Cote and Anton L Allahar explore the subverted idea of the university and the forces that have set adrift the mission of these institutions Cote and Allahar connect the corporatization of universities to a range of contentious issues within higher education, from lowered standards and inflated grades to the overall decline of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences instruction.Lowering Higher Education points to a fundamental disconnect between policymakers, who may rarely set foot in contemporary classrooms, and the teachers who must implement their educational policies which the authors argue are poorly informed on a daily basis Cote and Allahar expose stakeholder misconceptions surrounding the current culture of academic disengagement and supposed power of new technologies to motivate students While outlining what makes the status quo dysfunctional, Lowering Higher Education also offers recommendations that have the potential to reinvigorate liberal education.

    One thought on “Lowering Higher Education: The Rise of Corporate Universities and the Fall of Liberal Education”

    1. Written by sociologists at a Canadian university, this book captures the changes that have occurred in a university education over the last 50 years. Some topics addressed are lower standards, grade inflation, student disengagement (poor motivation), and a shifted focus toward vocational training rather than the merits of higher education in and of itself. This book raises issues that could help in evaluating and refining the education system as a whole.

    2. I am very, very glad to finally be finished with this book. While Cote and Allahar make some good points, I quickly grew fed up with their overly sassy tone and their overall writing style. I was NOT a fan. However, I was definitely comparing it with Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses the whole way through, so that certainly had an effect too.While their argument that we are lowering the standards of higher education and that this is a bad thing makes sense to me, it was a [...]

    3. This is a sigh of a book. My last sentence is not a critique. The book actually provides a deep, expansive reality check on the state of the current university system. There is a discussion of grade inflation, massification and the impact of education technology being sold in an attempt to reduce contact hours. While based in the Canadian - and particularly Ontario - system, there is relevance and resonance throughout the international academy.The book has a tone of despair, but throughout and p [...]

    4. If you are at all interested or involved in Higher Education I recommend you read this book. If the government and schools were to implement even some of their recommendations I think that it would drastically improve the preparation of students for University.One of the best points is that we need to remember that it's OK for our students to be "average". And average is the C range, not the B range. Too many schools have their grades clustered in the top third of the spectrum which doesn't actu [...]

    5. An interesting book that stimulates one to think about the politics inherent to the education system and the potential biases of different stakeholders, particularly the authors. I think they do a good job of covering topics, but of course their points are subjective to a point. The discussion of "digital natives" was quite interesting to me. I finished the book agreeing with some of their recommendations for reform & disagreeing with others.

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