The Road from Morocco

The Road from Morocco The Road from Morocco recounts the extraordinary life of Saadia and her daughter Wafa It transports readers back in time to a Middle Eastern society far removed from modern American sensibilities to M

  • Title: The Road from Morocco
  • Author: Wafa Faith Hallam
  • ISBN: 9781452808086
  • Page: 458
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Road from Morocco recounts the extraordinary life of Saadia and her daughter Wafa It transports readers back in time to a Middle Eastern society far removed from modern American sensibilities to Morocco, where Saadia was born and wed against her will at thirteen Based on recorded history and family memories, the book chronicles Saadia s arranged marriage and hardshipThe Road from Morocco recounts the extraordinary life of Saadia and her daughter Wafa It transports readers back in time to a Middle Eastern society far removed from modern American sensibilities to Morocco, where Saadia was born and wed against her will at thirteen Based on recorded history and family memories, the book chronicles Saadia s arranged marriage and hardships as a young mother to Wafa, a French educated, sexually liberated Muslim woman, who traveled to Europe and then to America, reaching a top position on Wall Street in theory, the fulfillment of her American dream but in reality an overwhelming experience that threatens everything she holds dear.Like the best of fiction, this is an intensely personal emotional rollercoaster tale full of twists and turns, which make it hard to put down In the words of a reader It s beautiful even in the heartbreaking moments and utterly exquisite in the pleasant ones.

    One thought on “The Road from Morocco”

    1. Very Strong Start, Tapers Off Into Self IndulgenceThat Wafa Faith Hallam has the skills to write is very evident in the first portion of this book, her personal life laid bare as a memoir in THE ROAD FROM MOROCCO. She offers some of the finest explanations about the ways of life in countries where women have traditionally been viewed as second-class citizens, the property of men, denied basic human rights, and how a few women have had the courage to alter that perception. Hallam also relates in [...]

    2. I want to see this in the cinema!Set aside a weekend to read this wonderful book because you will not want to put it down. Your heart will ache for the beautiful Moroccan child-bride and her life in captivity. You rejoice in herfreedom when she is finally released from marriage, but there is intense sadness and depression as she struggles with emotional instability. Although living free in America, the daughter of the Moroccan child-bride lives a parallel life of captivity and misery until she d [...]

    3. I understand the value of this story as a family memoir, but not for the general public.It is written in a narrative style with virtually no dialogue to break up the story. The reader is continually told what is happening and there are no situations to show the protagonists character and development. The idea of Muslim women within Moroccan society is not developed to any great degree which is a shame. There are also references to the history of Morocco, but the writer tells us this did not impa [...]

    4. This book was a great surprise. I searched for books about Moroccan culture for my trip there, but this one ended up being so much more. The author writes about her journey through adulthood that took her all over the world, achieving so much and yet feeling unfulfilled. It is a great story for women in every walk of life, and really gave me a new insight on what will truly make your life fulfilling. I am so grateful that I came upon this book!

    5. I purchased the Road from Morocco and then spent all day and night and into the next morning reading it, ignoring everything else around me.My eyes welled with tears more than once through this beautifully moving book, gripping from start to finish and with a sweet air of honesty and forgiveness permeating throughout, in spite of the terrible torments suffered.It is extremely well written and I would recommend it to anyone without a moment's hesitation.

    6. Interesting life story lived by an interesting woman. While the timeline was could be confusing, the author's honesty was at times breathtaking. Wafa makes no effort to make herself look like anyone other than who she is and which is quite refreshing.

    7. This author has a fascinating story to tell and a great way with words, but is badly in need of a good editor. Language errors and unbridled/disorganized storytelling got in the way of my enjoyment. Kudos to the author-- keep going, but find a good editor.

    8. What a waste of time! You learn nothing about Morocco. A long, long story about hedonistic, self-indulgent, self-centered family.

    9. I thought it was an okay memoir about a woman and her family. The timeline was a little hard to follow in some points though.

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