I, Mammal: Why Your Brain Links Status and Happiness

I Mammal Why Your Brain Links Status and Happiness Mammals seek dominance because it stimulates their happy chemicals An appetite for status develops as naturally as the appetite for food and sex Status hierarchies emerge spontaneously as each individ

  • Title: I, Mammal: Why Your Brain Links Status and Happiness
  • Author: Loretta Graziano Breuning
  • ISBN: 9781453750469
  • Page: 235
  • Format: Paperback
  • Mammals seek dominance because it stimulates their happy chemicals An appetite for status develops as naturally as the appetite for food and sex Status hierarchies emerge spontaneously as each individual strives to meet their needs and avoid harm You would never think this way in words, but your mammal brain uses neurochemicals instead of words When you understand theMammals seek dominance because it stimulates their happy chemicals An appetite for status develops as naturally as the appetite for food and sex Status hierarchies emerge spontaneously as each individual strives to meet their needs and avoid harm You would never think this way in words, but your mammal brain uses neurochemicals instead of words When you understand the private lives of animals, your neurochemical ups and downs make sense You have inherited the operating system that helped mammals thrive for millions of years Nothing is wrong with us We are mammals You may say you re against status But if you filled a room with people who said they were anti status, a hierarchy would soon form based on how anti status they are That s what mammals do Our neurochemical ups and downs make sense when you look at the private lives of animals The field notes of a primatologist are eerily similar to the lyrics of a country western song A biology textbook resembles a soap opera script The mammal brain cannot put its reactions into words, so the human cortex struggles to make sense of the limbic system it s attached to We can finally make sense of our hybrid brain thanks to an accumulation of research in animal science and neuroscience The frustrations of social hierarchies are not caused by our society We are simply heirs to the brain that helped mammals thrive for two hundred million years It s not easy being human with a mammalian operating system But when you understand the neurochemistry of mammals, you can stop focusing on our flaws and simply celebrate how well we do with the mental equipment we ve got Mammals live in groups for protection from predators, but group life can be frustrating Some herd mates always seem to get the best mating opportunities and foraging spots Fortunately, the mammal brain evolved to handle this It releases stress chemicals when a mammal needs to hold back to avoid conflict And it emits happy chemicals serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin and endorphins, when a mammal sees a way to forge ahead and meet its needs.

    One thought on “I, Mammal: Why Your Brain Links Status and Happiness”

    1. كتاب رائع يصف طريقة عمل الدماغ ويفسر اسباب جميع تصرفاتنا التي نراها غير منطقية ♥ يبين لما يسعى الانسان للافضل دائما كل شئ تحكمه كيميائيات الجسم التي كنت سابقا ارفض سيطرتها على افعالي لكناها تؤثر وجدا شكرا خالو حبيبي لترجمة الكتاب ♥

    2. I'm a Happy satisfied Cookie! (Quality Reading) >>> NO JUNK READING in 'this' gem!!!. My *Happy Chemicals* have been released :) GREAT BOOK! EXCELLENT!!! (such a wonderful surprise)No one likes the idea that we care about **STATUS**.but guess what folks??? WE DO! -- Yes, even us 'nice-sweet' people! The author has done her research --explains things well--easy to understand. Its a VERY ENJOYABLE page turning book. For those who spent some time with spiritual type books, (Eckhart Tolle, [...]

    3. Why am I impelled to act some way, sometimes to my benefit and sometimes perversely against my benefit? In this insightful book, Dr. Loretta Breuning, a professor at California State University, tells us.Our brains have been evolving for several million years. As the brain developed, it added functions on top of the old parts -- but those evolutionary leftovers are still in there, and they matter! Dr. Breuning lays it out in the following simple scheme: the oldest and simplest functions are our [...]

    4. I can't help but love Breuning's books. I Mammal may be my favorite, although they are all pretty spectacular. I Mammal reads like Machiavelli on neuroscience, evolutionary biology and ethology. That may sound pretty Satanic to some folks. But I personally find the opposite to be true. This shit is utterly liberating. The evolutionary framework clarifies and normalizes human behavior. That's a very good thing. I don't know how else to say it without ranting. The evolutionary perspective does not [...]

    5. I had mixed feelings about this book, which I believe was self-published. I bought it while researching mammal and primate evolution and the development of social behavior and emotions. Cognition, especially affective psychology, is a very complex subject. Breuning did a good job of honing in on a few simple aspects and explaining them in layman's terms. She made the right choice by focusing on four particular neurotransmitters, the "happy chemicals". Her central thesis, that emotions alert us t [...]

    6. Great book. The overall message - we all crave status. We may deny it, but it's rooted in our biology and we'll always strive to get it in subtle (or not so subtle) ways. Every mammal wants to dominate and the sooner we accept it, the better. The primary neurochemical in charge is SEROTONIN. When we have high status - our serotonin goes up. Likewise, when you feel that your status is low - serotonin levels are low too (which is why often it's linked to anxiety). The best way to boost your seroto [...]

    7. I have been reading about "happiness" and "fun" for about 15 years, ever since a really low point in my life. This is one of the 3 most important books I have ever read, period, because now I have a model that fits exactly with my ups and downs and a clear understanding of how to manage and even steer them successfully. IN PARTICULAR, her theory that "status" (essentially [as I understand the author] exercising control over how you're treated) is the opposite of depression was a eureka moment fo [...]

    8. I, Mammal will change the way you see yourself and the things around you. You will learn so much from this book. Very interesting and so much to learn.

    9. Interesting readVery insightful book about status hierarchies. Well written and documented ideas. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about societies.

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