Fizzles

Fizzles Samuel Beckett used the word fizzles to describe eight short prose pieces written between Most fizzles are unnamed and identified by their numbers or first few words Fizzle He is barehead

  • Title: Fizzles
  • Author: Samuel Beckett
  • ISBN: 9780802111937
  • Page: 107
  • Format: Paperback
  • Samuel Beckett used the word fizzles to describe eight short prose pieces written between 1973 1975.Most fizzles are unnamed, and identified by their numbers or first few words Fizzle 1 He is barehead Fizzle 2 Horn came always Fizzle 3 Afar a Bird Fizzle 4 I gave up before birth Fizzle 5 Closed place Fizzle 6 Old earth Fizzle 7 Still Fizzle 8 For to end yet agSamuel Beckett used the word fizzles to describe eight short prose pieces written between 1973 1975.Most fizzles are unnamed, and identified by their numbers or first few words Fizzle 1 He is barehead Fizzle 2 Horn came always Fizzle 3 Afar a Bird Fizzle 4 I gave up before birth Fizzle 5 Closed place Fizzle 6 Old earth Fizzle 7 Still Fizzle 8 For to end yet againExcluding Still, Beckett wrote all the fizzles in French, and later translated them into English All the Fizzles are included in the collection The Complete Short Prose 1929 1989 description from

    One thought on “Fizzles”

    1. Late Beckett, with its wave-like lyricism, provokes a sense of determinism and inescapable fate. This is as eerie as Beckett gets

    2. I wouldn't recommend it to everyone, but rather to the reader who likes a challenge. Quick read and wonderfully written as expected of Beckett.

    3. Nearly a decade ago, some semester at UMass, I read this slim collection. I read it too quickly. These brief pieces demand one's attention, and are best understood when read aloud. fizzle 4 is the most exquisite of them all, but they're all worth the time of any reader who has read and enjoyed any of Beckett's other works. Below are a few lines (with fizzle numbers in brackets) that are meaningful to me."confusion of memory and lament, of loved ones and impossible youth" [3]"These allusions to n [...]

    4. Although included in The Complete Short Prose, I like to keep this small book--guess we'd call it a chapbook now--handy to read on its own. I consider these stories an elemental source for unconventional syntax. The stories play with many of Beckett's core themes, but it seems he is most bent on stretching language to its limits via syntactical games. So, want to know what it means to break the rules of syntax and apply it persistently amidst a narrative? Start with Fizzles.

    5. yum, more late-period beckett to suck on. i like fizzle #4 the best. samuel is my literary father figure.

    6. A favorite. I will never finish this, it doesn't appear to be made to be 'finished.' I bought this in 1977 or so at St Marks Books while attending public High School in NJ and I keep around this Grove Press edition with exclusively typographical cover design. Distilled funny and sometimes opaque, there is something almost nasty in the shortness, but honed to an icepick. About a quarter inch thick and deep as a chasm? Full of paradoxes: "It was impossible that I should have a voice"and yet here h [...]

    7. This is one of my all-time favorite books of short fiction, right up there with Robbe-Grillet's Snapshots (yeah I'm Old Skool). Well, the argument about whether these pieces are poetry or extended prose poems could be extended infinitely, in an Eleatic game Beckett would probably love anyway. The edition with the art by Jasper Johns is killer good. The art complements the work well. This is the sort of book where you want to grab a telephone, call a friend and say "ohmigod, LISTEN to this shit" [...]

    8. While I have read Beckett in the past and really enjoyed him, I found this collection of "fizzles" to be a little disappointing. Some of them were interesting, but I felt as if many had no greater message I could easily discern. If I sat down and really tried to, I'm sure I could find meaning in the more disappointing fizzles, but this makes the collection not extremely enjoyable as a light read. Overall, though, I did like the writing style, as I knew I would, and the collection was worth it as [...]

    9. Beckett's "stories" have boiled down to a startling sparseness by the time these were written, between the early 60s and the early 70s. Still, there is a lot of satisfaction to be gotten from these pieces, and they don't feel at all like fragments.

    10. Mostly impenetrable chapbook with eight stories by Beckett. With the exception of Fizzle #4, this collection was completely lost on me.

    11. Typical mid-to-late Beckett prose: confined spaces, weird phrases, no idea of what's going on. Some of the pieces seems maybe interesting, but most of them were boring and unintelligible.

    12. Returning to my project of reading the whole of Samuel Beckett's works in chronological order, I found myself bogged down after How It Is but have now, after some months, returned to the project by reading all of the short prose pieces written between 1956 and this little gem of 1976. Now I understand why I was bogged down. Beckett himself seems bogged down, especially if you read these short texts in chronological order in fairly rapid succession in the Collected Short prose volume as I did. I [...]

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