Unsettling the Settler Within: Indian Residential Schools, Truth Telling, and Reconciliation in Canada

Unsettling the Settler Within Indian Residential Schools Truth Telling and Reconciliation in Canada In the Canadian government apologized to the victims of the notorious Indian residential school system and established a Truth and Reconciliation Commission whose goal was to mend the deep rifts

  • Title: Unsettling the Settler Within: Indian Residential Schools, Truth Telling, and Reconciliation in Canada
  • Author: Paulette Regan Taiaiake Alfred
  • ISBN: 9780774817783
  • Page: 468
  • Format: Paperback
  • In 2008 the Canadian government apologized to the victims of the notorious Indian residential school system, and established a Truth and Reconciliation Commission whose goal was to mend the deep rifts between Aboriginal peoples and the settler society that engineered the system In Unsettling the Settler Within, Paulette Regan, a former residential schools claims manager,In 2008 the Canadian government apologized to the victims of the notorious Indian residential school system, and established a Truth and Reconciliation Commission whose goal was to mend the deep rifts between Aboriginal peoples and the settler society that engineered the system In Unsettling the Settler Within, Paulette Regan, a former residential schools claims manager, argues that in order to truly participate in the transformative possibilities of reconciliation, non Aboriginal Canadians must undergo their own process of decolonization They must relinquish the persistent myth of themselves as peacemakers and acknowledge the destructive legacy of a society that has stubbornly ignored and devalued Indigenous experience With former students offering their stories as part of the truth and reconciliation processes, Regan advocates for an ethos that learns from the past, making space for an Indigenous historical counter narrative to avoid perpetuating a colonial relationship between Aboriginal and settler peoples A powerful and compassionate call to action, Unsettling the Settler Within inspires with its thoughtful and personal account of Regan s own journey, and offers all Canadians Indigenous and non Indigenous policymakers, politicians, teachers, and students a new way of approaching the critical task of healing the wounds left by the residential school system.

    One thought on “Unsettling the Settler Within: Indian Residential Schools, Truth Telling, and Reconciliation in Canada”

    1. This book was a pretty good read but I skipped mush of it. Regan goes into depth and length quoting many sources to supplement her understanding of the decolonization process. I skipped much of this because I used to work with Indigenous communities regularly. Of course, I was working under the Indian Act so whatever I was doing was already part of the colonial system. I was at a meeting where our DM was noted saying, "The Indian Act cannot be stripped down; it is like the roots of the tree. You [...]

    2. Well written, thoughtful, and informed look at the idea of reconciliation in Canada. Regan does an excellent job of balancing personal experience, recent events in First Nation-Settler relations, and scholarly opinions. This is book is a great call to all Canadians to look at our conceptions of history, peacekeeping, and reconciliation. Regan challenges readers to acknowledge their settler bias and accept a complete history of Canada.

    3. Turns the gaze away from the subject, Aboriginal peoples, to the settlers. With the intention of achieving 'genuine' reconciliation, the author aims to have Canadian settlers see themselves, not as peaceful and tolerant administrators, but colonisers deploying all the tools that colonisers use upon original inhabitants.

    4. Dense read, but necessary for any settler wishing to decolonize their minds & hearts & dismantle the colonial project of Canada. Gives pedagogical guidance for settlers who wish to work in solidarity with indigenous peoples towards peace, justice and truth, without reinscribing the deeply entrenched colonizer-colonized relationship. Took some time, but glad I read it.

    5. It took me a long time to read this book (a year and a half) because it was dense with learning and I needed to pause after sections to absorb the information before I moved on. In 2014, I participated in a courageous and imaginative event, a Reconciliation Event, that was the vision of the youth of a fly-in only Northern Ontario First Nation community called Kitchenuhmayooosib Inninuwug (KI) or Big Trout Lake. I went with 30 other "ordinary Canadians" and lived with a family for a week and part [...]

    6. Mixed feelings, good intentions: a helpful and necessary book, but a good one? Unresolved questions abound.

    7. This was a difficult book to read, and, I imagine, a hard one to write. Paulette Regan has made an extensive study of decolonization writings and put them into practice in her work with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It was interesting and instructive to read about her own experiences as a settler-Canadian as she came to terms with the shattering of the myth of Canadians as peacemakers in the context of the violence done to indigenous communities of Canada by the residential school sys [...]

    8. A really important book with a lot of great insight from a voice of experience and intelligence. I mainly wish it had been written more accessibly, less academically. Because every settler Canadian should read this kind of book and think about it. But for many it would be too much of a slog to do so. Hopefully though this book serves as the start of an ongoing conversation. Because as Regan says, there is no "Indian problem." There is rather a "Settler problem."

    9. From the research director of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada comes a thoughtful analysis of settlers' role in reconciliation with Indigenous people and decolonization. Regan provides a well-researched "historical counter-narrative" illuminated by accounts of her personal experiences working through these processes.

    10. Well written and researched. A good start for understanding important issues surrounding truth and reconciliation from the perspective of a non- Native, 'settler-ally '. Quality content. Interesting insights. A little hard to read but not really.

    11. This a is great book and should become a part of basic school reading for everyone. will be buying a copy to own.

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