The Instigators

The Instigators In a small band of political activists in Egypt led by a young engineer named Ahmed Maher began organizing on Facebook under the moniker April Youth Dodging the secret police both online and o

  • Title: The Instigators
  • Author: David Wolman
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 161
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • In 2008, a small band of political activists in Egypt led by a young engineer named Ahmed Maher began organizing on Facebook under the moniker April 6 Youth Dodging the secret police both online and off, they built a Web page into a movement Then, in January 2011, they helped architect a final showdown with the country s dictator David Wolman unspools the riveting behinIn 2008, a small band of political activists in Egypt led by a young engineer named Ahmed Maher began organizing on Facebook under the moniker April 6 Youth Dodging the secret police both online and off, they built a Web page into a movement Then, in January 2011, they helped architect a final showdown with the country s dictator David Wolman unspools the riveting behind the scenes story of these daring activists and how they planted the digital seeds of a revolution Award winning journalist and author David Wolman is a contributing editor at Wired, a former Fulbright journalism fellow and a winner of the 2011 Oregon Arts Commission individual artists fellowship He is the author of two works of nonfiction His third book, The End of Money, will be published in February.

    One thought on “The Instigators”

    1. This is the true story of the groups that formed, developed, and enacted what would become Egypt's version of the Arab Spring. The key players in their Digital Revolution are highlighted, the plans for the march to and assembly on Tahir Square are highlighted. The real dangers those in the groups faced, one persons death that was a rallying cry for may Egyptians, and the final straw that got the masses out in the streets to enacted real change are detailed. A well written easy read, that should [...]

    2. Wolman is a journalist for Wired and here he recounts the story of the Arab uprising in Egypt in 2011. He interviewed the leading figures and brings the online and street protests to the American reader.Why I started this book: I was waiting in line, and I knew that it was only a couple of pages long.Why I finished it: Very interesting and inspiring to think of how individuals can change their world and how hard it is for modern dictators to fight against online organization.

    3. This was my first 'Kindle Single' to read. It tells the story of some of the Egyption protesters who began organizing online back in 2008 and through determined study of non-violent protests and movements, were able to bring about regime change in their country. It was a breezy and easy to read short book and left me wanting to know more about why this was possible in Egypt and how 20th century Egyption history played out.

    4. Wolman tells the story of Ahmed Maher, the young Egyptian engineer that founded the April 6 Youth Movement, using Facebook to organize and mobilize supporters in the successful campaign to oust Hosni Mubarak as the country's head of state, which was a short (34 pp) but very good read.

    5. Interesting and easy to read. It filled in some gaps in the sequence of events starting from 2008 (which is when I first became aware of A6Y) and helped me understand the significance of key dates, like 25 January. But I would love to know what my Egyptian friends think of this essay.

    6. This book came with several good reviews. I am the furthest thing from a political junking going. It wasn't that appealing for me. However, I do think it would appear to those who enjoy reading about political events.

    7. Great case study and historic moment demonstrating how a few people can make a difference, especially in the age of instant activism through social media.

    8. This was a great introduction to understanding some of the unrest going on in Egypt. Too short, but it was a good educational, yet interesting read.

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