Any Man So Daring

Any Man So Daring William Shakespeare has become the preeminent playwright of Elizabethan England but his success comes with a price his son Hamnet has disappeared in the realm of the Elven King and Will must face th

  • Title: Any Man So Daring
  • Author: Sarah A. Hoyt
  • ISBN: 9780441012084
  • Page: 240
  • Format: Paperback
  • William Shakespeare has become the preeminent playwright of Elizabethan England, but his success comes with a price his son Hamnet has disappeared in the realm of the Elven King, and Will must face the powers of darkness to rescue him.

    One thought on “Any Man So Daring”

    1. This book, the third in Hoyt's series, is a fine conclusion, wrapping up loose ends nicely with a light touch much appreciated after the darkness of All Night Awake. At the same time, some of the things that I found so charming in the first book are beginning to wear on me a bit by the third. The Shakespearean quotes are still clever, but when they become lengthy and, even worse, rhyme, they start to feel a bit forced. And the allusions to the plays felt more heavy-handed than in previous instal [...]

    2. After I started this book I discovered that it is actually the third book in a trilogy. I went ahead and read it anyway and am pretty sure I didn't miss anything of importance since the first two books are recapped ad nauseum.The main premise of the story is certainly intriguing: William Shakespeare unwillingly involved in the intrigues of fairyland. Shakespeare quotes and allusions abound, with the implication that these adventures are one source of his genius. Despite the great potential, I fo [...]

    3. Earlier installments of Hoyt's Shakespearean Fantasies series mix Shakespeare's reluctant involvement with the elves' grand battles of good vs. evil. In comparison, Any Man So Daring is well, a pity party. This A Midsummer Night's Dream retelling takes place on an island in a sea of magic, "the crux" that is the center of Fairyland's magic, but we don't get to see any of the supposedly dire consequences for using magic in the crux. Instead we see all the familiar characters' petulance, dithering [...]

    4. A fine ending to the Shakespeare trilogy. I could see where the plot was leading pretty early on, but these books are more about the characters and the weight that their choices carry. Again Hoyt has proven herself to understand what makes people tick better than most other authors do.

    5. In this tale William Shakespeare finds himself entangled in the affairs of the land of elves when his son is kidnapped by a young elf of that realm. The storyline itself was okay, but the characters spent too much time second guessing their motives and feelings, which made the story drag a bit.

    6. Took a long time reading this one, Maybe should not have skipped book two, The ending is the best part. What else can I say?

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