Eight Days of Luke

Eight Days of Luke There seemed nothing strange about Luke to begin with except perhaps the snakes If they were snakes David wasn t sure He was just grateful for a companion as agreeable as Luke who seemed able to twi

  • Title: Eight Days of Luke
  • Author: Diana Wynne Jones
  • ISBN: 9780064473576
  • Page: 224
  • Format: Paperback
  • There seemed nothing strange about Luke to begin with, except perhaps the snakes If they were snakes David wasn t sure He was just grateful for a companion as agreeable as Luke, who seemed able to twist anyone round his finger, even David s odious relatives Just kindle a flame and I ll be with you, Luke said, and he always was which turned out to be awkward tThere seemed nothing strange about Luke to begin with, except perhaps the snakes If they were snakes David wasn t sure He was just grateful for a companion as agreeable as Luke, who seemed able to twist anyone round his finger, even David s odious relatives Just kindle a flame and I ll be with you, Luke said, and he always was which turned out to be awkward than useful in the end For who were the people who seemed to be looking for Luke the man with one eye the massive, malevolent gardener, Mr.Chew the offensively sprightly Frys the man with ginger hair Why were there ravens watching, one in front and one at the back gate And then of course there was the fire

    One thought on “Eight Days of Luke”

    1. Perhaps my favourite anecdote about this book is that Neil Gaiman said that he had to rewrite American Gods because he got to the end and realised that he'd just rewritten this.The real joy here is the slow-burning realisation of what is going on. The care with which Wynne Jones constructs the plot to ensure that the characters only appear on the appropriate "days" is only really apparent on a re-read, and the book is good enough to survive that without trouble.

    2. With unending cleverness, Diana Wynne Jones weaves a wonderful tale of loneliness and friendship, heroics and half-wit relatives, dreary dull English life and the full legendary pantheon of Norway, Eight Days of Luke is the slow-burn story of an accidental protagonist stumbling upon an earth-shaking mystery and adventure. Transforming the lives of disheartened David and everyone else around him, Luke tumbles into England and sets off an irreversible course of events destined to make David a new [...]

    3. 2018:Nothing like an old favorite to make you feel all wrapped up in a warm hug. This book remains a delight, always.__________2007:I freaking love Norse mythology like you don't even know.This book is perfect.I only wish I'd known about it when I was younger; as happy as I am to know about it now, little me was also freaking in love with Norse mythology and would have enjoyed this so much.

    4. It was either this book or Dogsbody that was my first Diana Wynne Jones novel, many, many years ago now. I no longer remember which one, and both have a special place in my heart and my memory.I have been looking forward to rediscovering them both - and while both were published in 1975, Ms Wynne Jones' offical fan site lists Eight Days of Luke first, so that's the order I'm rereading.I went into the book remembering the basics - who Luke was and that it was based on Norse mythology - but the de [...]

    5. I'm afraid that I can't do this review without being mildly spoilery, but it's okay since everyone else is doing the same -- even though it is, I fear, perhaps not as obvious as I think it is. Anyway, you've had your chance to look away, here's the spoiler: this is based, to some extent, on Norse mythology. And Luke is Loki. That was apparent to me just about straight away, though through the wonders of my new medication I have no idea whether I read about that in the collection of Diana Wynne J [...]

    6. YA Fantasy. David is a Miserable Orphan forced to live with his neglectful, petty relatives. As far as Miserable Orphans go (see also: Harry Potter, the Baudelaires) he doesn't have it that bad, but it could be better. Like, when he comes home from boarding school for summer holiday, his guardians are surprised to see him. So he decides to curse them, as you do.Somehow, this goes wrong and he releases the god Loki from his underground prison instead. Luke, as he introduces himself, seems about D [...]

    7. This is one of the few Diana Wynne Jones books I didn't read as a twelve year old, and I can't say I missed much. I didn't like this. I think it's very competently written and the family resentment is superb, and that's all I appreciate here. I'm not one for mythological stories in general, and this feels uninspired. The treasure hunt is almost an afterthought; the plot in general feels half-baked, abrupt and poorly paced. And everyone's willingness to go with the flow, to be so accepting of the [...]

    8. ============================================Original review, with very much needed original update:============================================UPDATE: Please note: Whilst writing this review, I felt, well, rather… bonkers.Eight Days of Luke is just the sort of story that makes me feel quite jolly. As in, a normal setting, but you know… including something not quite as common. Which is equivalent to "ABSOLUTELY WONDEFUL!" I feel wearied for reason of not writing a dignified comma-inclusive li [...]

    9. I loved this fresh take on Norse mythology. Luke is a terrific character. I would never have thought it possible to make a young and innocent Loki, but this portrayal convinced me. And I was glad that though innocent he remained dangerous.I also loved David--I was worried he'd be somehow marked as a long-lost Norse character reclaimed during the story, and I was glad that he was allowed to remain an ordinary kid, with all the special powers of perception and daring that ordinary kids really have [...]

    10. Jones, D.W. (1975). Eight Days of Luke. New York: Greenwillow Books.226 pages.Appetizer: David Allard is on break from school and instead of being sent of on an educational tour, his relatives have forgotten he was supposed to come home and so he is stuck with them and their criticisms of him.At first it seems like it will be a complete torture, but after chanting a random mix of words, a strange boy named Luke appears. Luke claims that David released him from his prison and is indebted to him. [...]

    11. A complete delight from beginning to end. This is a trickster Loki story, with a delightful middle-grade take on the character. This is Loki at his trickster best: never malicious, but far from tame.David is a fantastic character, a good-natured boy saddled with a rather terrible family. His understandable resentment of their treatment of him leads him to accidentally break Loki out of his imprisonment. And from there the plot takes off. There are disguised Norse gods, road trips and ravens a lo [...]

    12. I love visiting bookstores when I’m on vacation. First of all: books! And second, I’ve already given myself permission to relax, eat, drink and be merry, and reading for fun and on a whim is certainly part of the process. So when I went to Ireland for ten days with my friends last month, I did a little advance research and found some bookshops in my path. The Gutter Bookshop in Dublin is a delightful, airy place, and while I was perusing the children’s and YA section there I came across a [...]

    13. David doesn't like his boarding school much, but he dislikes holidays more, because he has to go home. "Home" is with his great-aunt and -uncle, Cousin Ronald, and Ronald's cousin Astrid, none of whom like him very much (and the feeling's mutual). Between the horrible food, the constant scolding, and their expectation that he should be grateful for all of that ("gratitude" being shown by groveling or, better yet, never having been born), David is miserable about the long summer months ahead. The [...]

    14. Long before a lovable orphan named Harry suffered at the hands of the Dursleys, a lovable cricket-playing orphan named David Allard was hating life with his awful relations, Uncle Bernard, Aunt Dot, and Cousin Ronald. He tries hard to be grateful for the way they've looked after him since his parents died, but it's tough when all they seem to want to do is criticize him or send him away. When he gets stuck in their company one summer, he glumly anticipates months of misery.That is, until he meet [...]

    15. UPDATE: Please note: Whilst writing this review, I felt, well, rather… bonkers.Eight Days of Luke is just the sort of story that makes me feel quite jolly. As in, a normal setting, but you know… including something not quite as common. Which is equivalent to "ABSOLUTELY WONDEFUL!" I feel wearied for reason of not writing a dignified comma-inclusive list for a while, therefore what is a better time than now? Eight Days of Luke is stuffed full of British relatives (which have to make a book go [...]

    16. This one was a lot of fun, but slightly fluffy, sort of like an Eva Ibbotson book but one of her better ones. There's a lightness to the story that is great for younger chapterbook readers despite being about the typical lonely, neglected British school boy. What I liked best was the focus on disguised mythological Norse gods, making this a sort of American Gods for kids book. This would be really great to read after doing a study unit on Norse mythology to see how fast the students can pick up [...]

    17. I loved this book from the first to its last page. It's so smart and funny and so beautifully written that once I finished it my first thought was to immediately re-read it. I liked David from the beginning, while Astrid was really a surprise, but the one I fell in love with was - rather obviously - Luke. It's so rare to find Loki depicted in such a positive way, I really couldn't help myself. I also loved the friendly relationship he seemed to have with Thor, and the always ambiguous and oddly [...]

    18. One of Diana Wynne Jones' best. I have to admit although I had my suspicion when I read the book, DWJ succeeded in keeping me guessing. And when it all came to light at the end, I just couldn't help but go WOW YEAH!!

    19. This isn't a review per se but I love how Diana often leaves her readers to the power of deduction at the end of every book. Once you've deduced it, bam! Mindblown.

    20. This is a re-read -- I probably haven't read it in over 30 years, and there were a lot of details that had been completely forgotten. What I remembered of this one is the exploration of ideas from mythology that don't require that the reader have any understanding of the myths, including the summoning of 'Luke' by the main character, David, by the breaking of the bonds by the random recitation of the necessary words. On rereading, I noticed that there are many little details that can be useful f [...]

    21. Eight days of Luke tells the story of David, an orphan who is staying on summer vacation with foster relatives who mistreat him. He will free and met Luke, a cunning boy, who is a master of tricks and speech as well. As they become closer friends in short time, David and Luke will have to hide the latter from the unexpected intentions of Mr Wedding and his people. Luke did something that he is blame for and David is the only one that can make amends and turn things back to the way they were befo [...]

    22. Others have summarized the plot, so I won't do that here. Suffice to say that a young teen, David Allard, is extremely unwelcome when he comes home for summer break. By accident, he releases a boy his age from a magical prison, and his summer becomes much more interesting. I loved David; he's a very real kid, innocently blurting out things the adults find hurtful even though David has no malice at all. And he does his dead-level best to help his new friend. I also came to love Luke himself, thou [...]

    23. In my opinion, Diana Wynne Jones was one of the best young adult writers in the world. Unlike most of the other books of hers I have read, 8 days of Luke is set in 'modern times' (1975). It takes place in a world seemingly just like ours, without the alternative history element of a lot of her books. When an orphan boy is forced to holiday with his atrocious relatives and told repeatedly to be grateful, he strides off into the garden vowing to curse them. Instead of the perfect curse, his mind l [...]

    24. I love it when a book I read as a child holds up to reading as an adult. Jones is such a great writer. She is so strong with dialogue, characters and plot. It annoyed me that I couldn’t remember my Norse Myths, I had to wait to the end of the story to figure out who was who.

    25. I Love norse mythology I love Diana Wynne JonesSo I expected to love this. My expectations were met. I really wanted more from the ending, but this is something you learn to live with as a DWJ fan.

    26. Interesting and entertaining take on Norse and Germanic mythology. A good standalone for starting out with this author.

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