The Oxford History of Byzantium

The Oxford History of Byzantium The Oxford History of Byzantium is the only history to provide in concise form detailed coverage of Byzantium from its Roman beginnings to the fall of Constantinople and assimilation into the Turkish

  • Title: The Oxford History of Byzantium
  • Author: Cyril Mango
  • ISBN: 9780198140986
  • Page: 328
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Oxford History of Byzantium is the only history to provide in concise form detailed coverage of Byzantium from its Roman beginnings to the fall of Constantinople and assimilation into the Turkish Empire Lively essays and beautiful illustrations portray the emergence and development of a distinctive civilization, covering the period from the fourth century to the mid fThe Oxford History of Byzantium is the only history to provide in concise form detailed coverage of Byzantium from its Roman beginnings to the fall of Constantinople and assimilation into the Turkish Empire Lively essays and beautiful illustrations portray the emergence and development of a distinctive civilization, covering the period from the fourth century to the mid fifteenth century The authors all working at the cutting edge of their particular fields outline the political history of the Byzantine state and bring to life the evolution of a colourful culture.In AD 324, the Emperor Constantine the Great chose Byzantion, an ancient Greek colony at the mouth of the Thracian Bosphorous, as his imperial residence He renamed the place Constaninopolis nova Roma , Constantinople, the new Rome and the city modern Istanbul became the Eastern capital of the later Roman empire The new Rome outlived the old and Constantine s successors continued to regard themselves as the legitimate emperors of Rome, just as their subjects called themselves Romaioi, or Romans long after they had forgotten the Latin language In the sixteenth century, Western humanists gave this eastern Roman empire ruled from Constantinople the epithet Byzantine.Against a backdrop of stories of emperors, intrigues, battles, and bishops, this Oxford History uncovers the hidden mechanisms economic, social, and demographic that underlay the history of events The authors explore everyday life in cities and villages, manufacture and trade, machinery of government, the church as an instrument of state, minorities, education, literary activity, beliefs and superstitions, monasticism, iconoclasm, the rise of Islam, and the fusion with Western, or Latin, culture Byzantium linked the ancient and modern worlds, shaping traditions and handing down to both Eastern and Western civilization a vibrant legacy.

    One thought on “The Oxford History of Byzantium”

    1. Това е най-ужасната история на каквото и да било, която съм чела. Като изключим обема, за който все пак знаех преди да я започна, всичко друго беше непредвидимо зле, особено конструкцията на главите. : ))

    2. In spite of Byzantium finally getting its fair share of attention among historians over the last century, good single-volume introductions to the empire are few. John Julian Norwich's A SHORT HISTORY OF BYZANTIUM, an abridgement of his massive popular work in three tomes, is one option. But I was happy to come across THE OXFORD HISTORY OF BYZANTIUM and would recommend this as a good introduction. Each chapter of the OXFORD HISTORY was written by a different scholar, adding some variety to the bo [...]

    3. This book gave a brief history of the Byzantine Empire, mentioning religious and political topics. It gives a basic overview, but is not as good as expected because of the amount of page space taken by photographic illustrations. Most of the illustrations are of Eastern icons, which play a major role in parts of the book. "The Oxford History of Byzantium" does not give enough information about the daily life of common people or regional differences. It mainly tells of emperors, archbishops, patr [...]

    4. Overall Mango does an adequate job in stitching together the individual chapters but for some reason the book still felt a little chopped up. It was perhaps due to the way that they liked to present the “cultural” chapters after the political ones, and that implies for the reader to make his own connections between the political developments and the cultural artifacts of a particular era. In the end it was not a bad book, but I’d probably not recommend it.

    5. This would have been so much better as straight chronological narrative. The book is interspersed with breaks on specific cultural topics, which interrupts the flow of the book

    6. This book is a series of essays about the history and culture of the Byzantine Empire. It provides an excellent introduction to someone without a lot of familiarity with the subject.

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