Liberty on the Waterfront: American Maritime Culture in the Age of Revolution

Liberty on the Waterfront American Maritime Culture in the Age of Revolution Liberty on the Waterfront American Maritime Culture in the Age of Revolution Paul A Gilje Winner of the SHEAR Book Prize Winner of the John Lyman Book Award for U S Maritime History from the

  • Title: Liberty on the Waterfront: American Maritime Culture in the Age of Revolution
  • Author: Paul A. Gilje
  • ISBN: 9780812219937
  • Page: 448
  • Format: Paperback
  • Liberty on the Waterfront American Maritime Culture in the Age of Revolution Paul A Gilje Winner of the 2005 SHEAR Book Prize Winner of the 2004 John Lyman Book Award for U.S Maritime History from the North American Society for Oceanic History In its ambitious sweep and encyclopedic detail, Gilje s rendering of American maritime culture during the tumultuous century froLiberty on the Waterfront American Maritime Culture in the Age of Revolution Paul A Gilje Winner of the 2005 SHEAR Book Prize Winner of the 2004 John Lyman Book Award for U.S Maritime History from the North American Society for Oceanic History In its ambitious sweep and encyclopedic detail, Gilje s rendering of American maritime culture during the tumultuous century from 1750 to 1850 is unlikely to be surpassed William and Mary Quarterly Liberty on the Waterfront dramatically alters past perceptions of sailors and their worlds afloat and ashore A broad based and skillfully crafted piece of social history Journal of American History This well written, well illustrated volume should become the standard, most accessible single source on seamen in antebellum America for many years to come Reviews in American History In its ambitious sweep and encyclopedic detail, Gilje s rendering of American maritime culture during the tumultuous century from 1750 to 1850 is unlikely to be surpassed William and Mary Quarterly Through careful research and colorful accounts, historian Paul A Gilje discovers what liberty meant to an important group of common men in American society, those who lived and worked on the waterfront and aboard ships In the process he reveals that the idealized vision of liberty associated with the Founding Fathers had a much immediate and complex meaning than previously thought In Liberty on the Waterfront American Maritime Culture in the Age of Revolution, life aboard warships, merchantmen, and whalers, as well as the interactions of mariners and others on shore, is recreated in absorbing detail Describing the important contributions of sailors to the resistance movement against Great Britain and their experiences during the Revolutionary War, Gilje demonstrates that, while sailors recognized the ideals of the Revolution, their idea of liberty was far individual in nature often expressed through hard drinking and womanizing or joining a ship of their choice Gilje continues the story into the post Revolutionary world highlighted by the Quasi War with France, the confrontation with the Barbary Pirates, and the War of 1812 Paul A Gilje is Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma He is the author of Rioting in America and The Road to Mobocracy Popular Disorder in New York City, 1763 1834 Early American Studies 2003 360 pages 6 x 9 43 illus ISBN 978 0 8122 1993 7 Paper 26.50s 17.50 World Rights American History

    One thought on “Liberty on the Waterfront: American Maritime Culture in the Age of Revolution”

    1. Liberty on the Waterfront provides a colorful narrative of maritime culture during the revolutionary period. Paul Gilje argues that sailors became a symbol of revolutionary ideals. These “Tar Jacks,” with their capricious-spending, drunkenness, and rowdy behavior, shunned traditional society. Sailors represented a culture that challenged established British social hierarchy. In short, the sailor, perhaps unconsciously, held symbolic importance for revolutionary-minded citizens of port towns. [...]

    2. Rounding up from 3.5. Very good research and wonderful notes (I spent a lot of time perusing the notes and looking up new books to follow up with). However, the sections lack cohesion; the book reads like loosely related essays rather than a continuous narrative. This may be the nature of the topic, but it would have been nice if either a specific region or time period was focused on--"Age of Revolution" covers a lot of ground, and what was going on in 1830 was pretty different than 1790. Also, [...]

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