Happy Life

Happy Life David Budbill is a no nonsense free range sage who celebrates tomatoes in September the whistle of a woodcock and sweet black tea and ancient Chinese poems New York Times Budbill both informs and mov

  • Title: Happy Life
  • Author: David Budbill
  • ISBN: 9781556593741
  • Page: 205
  • Format: Paperback
  • David Budbill is a no nonsense free range sage who celebrates tomatoes in September, the whistle of a woodcock and sweet black tea and ancient Chinese poems New York Times Budbill both informs and moves He is, in short, a delight and a comfort Wendell Berry Budbill can be hilarious, as when he gripes, What good is my humility when I am stuck in this obscuri David Budbill is a no nonsense free range sage who celebrates tomatoes in September, the whistle of a woodcock and sweet black tea and ancient Chinese poems New York Times Budbill both informs and moves He is, in short, a delight and a comfort Wendell Berry Budbill can be hilarious, as when he gripes, What good is my humility when I am stuck in this obscurity Booklist, starred review His terse, epigrammatic lyrics are a lilting mirror of classical Chinese poetry The Wichita EagleDavid Budbill continues his popular poetic ruminations on life in remote New England an outward survey of a forested mountain and an introspection of self reliance, anonymity, and the creative life Inspired by classical Chinese and Japanese poets, Budbill contemplates the seasons, ambition, his questionable desire for fame and fortune, and simple, focused contentment Weed the beans Pick the peas Out in the Woods The only time I m really free is when I m out in the woodscutting firewood, stacking brush, clearing trails.Just the chain saw, the dog and me.Heave and groan, sweat and ache.Work until I can t stand it any.Take a break.Sit on the needle strewn ground up against a big pine tree,drink some water, stare out through the woods, pet the dog.Stretch out on the ground, take a nap,dog s head on my lap.Ah, this would be the time and place and wayto die.David Budbill is the author of poems, plays, essays, speeches, and book reviews He has also served as a commentator on NPR s All Things Considered He lives in the mountains of northern Vermont where he tends his garden and website.

    One thought on “Happy Life”

    1. Meditative, contemplative, mindful of each breath, alert, observant, quiet, at peace, yet recognizing the places where tension pulls and tugs at the edges, even at the center. In place and writing from a life flowing from that place, not detached and devoid of concrete experience, but submerged in chopping wood, splitting wood, stacking wood, burning wood, along with growing food, canning and preserving food, and then enjoying eating that food and basking in the warmth of those fires, sweat, toi [...]

    2. For the past year or so, I have been reading a few poems a day, rotating through a stack of 5-6 books next to my bed. I consistently found myself looking forward to when Happy Life got to the top of the pile. Some of of the other poetry I've been reading has been so incomprehensible that I end up trying so hard to figure out what it means that I don't get a chance to figure out how it makes me feel. Budbill's poems are accessible. I hesitate to say "simple", because that word could have such a n [...]

    3. i've been reading david budbill's poetry for many years. he writes from the solitude of Judevine Mountain in New England. His poems are filled with reverence for nature, dry wit, and a deep appreciation for silence, as evidenced by this poem from "Happy Life":Just Silence and Stillnessthis warm September morning. No wind, no birds' songs,no jets going over at 30,000 feet,but later today the wind will pick up, a slight breeze will begin.A pileated woodpecker will call off in the woods somewhere.R [...]

    4. David Budbill writes beautiful poetry that is inspired by the Buddhist Zen and the "cold mountain" poetry of Han Shan and other poets of China and Japan. He writes of a simple, engaged, and creative life in the mountains, but being drawn to ambition and city life, fame and fortune. He writes about the change of seasons and growing older. By turns, inspiring, heartbreaking, and appreciative, there is joy in his work that is infectious.

    5. I started out loving this book, but by the end I felt there were a few poems that he shouldn't have put out there because they just weren't good poems yet. So I can only rate it 3 stars which is still pretty good.

    6. Some of the poems in this 2011 volume hit the mark. They are peaceful and elegantly simple.But too many are just list poems or poems after ancient Chinese poets that soundrepetitious. I wanted a little edge or piquancy to these mostly diary-type poems. Okay.

    7. Budbill at his best - but then, what else is there? Someone once said if you don't like the blues you have to have a hole in your soul. The same thing applies to David's poetry. From soul to soul he writes nothing but the truth.

    8. He lost me on the first poem (nobody's days are their own) and didn't manage to pull me back in, though I appreciated the tomatoes and found his air breathable (though thin).

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