Lifeblood: How to Change the World One Dead Mosquito at a Time

Lifeblood How to Change the World One Dead Mosquito at a Time In the Wall Street pioneer and philanthropist Ray Chambers flicked through some holiday snapshots taken by his friend development economist Jeff Sachs and remarked on the placid beauty of a gr

  • Title: Lifeblood: How to Change the World One Dead Mosquito at a Time
  • Author: Alex Perry
  • ISBN: 9781610390866
  • Page: 209
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In 2006, the Wall Street pioneer and philanthropist Ray Chambers flicked through some holiday snapshots taken by his friend, development economist Jeff Sachs, and remarked on the placid beauty of a group of sleeping Malawian children They re not sleeping, Sachs told him They re in malarial comas A few days later, they were all dead Chambers had long avoided the pubIn 2006, the Wall Street pioneer and philanthropist Ray Chambers flicked through some holiday snapshots taken by his friend, development economist Jeff Sachs, and remarked on the placid beauty of a group of sleeping Malawian children They re not sleeping, Sachs told him They re in malarial comas A few days later, they were all dead Chambers had long avoided the public eye, but this moment sparked his determination to coordinate an unprecedented, worldwide effort to eradicate a disease that has haunted humanity since before the advent of medicine Award winning journalist Alex Perry obtained unique access to Chambers, now the UN Special Envoy for Malaria In this book, Perry weaves together science and history with on the ground reporting and a riveting expos of the workings of humanitarian aid to document Chambers campaign By replacing traditional ideas of assistance with business acumen and hustle, Chambers saved millions of lives, and upturned current notions of aid, forging a new path not just for the developing world but for global business and philanthropy.

    One thought on “Lifeblood: How to Change the World One Dead Mosquito at a Time”

    1. This is a puff piece glorifying one rich guy and his "business" approach to fighting malaria. The book hops all over the place without a real story or a logical thesis.No proof is given of what the rich guy has actually accomplished, just some wishful accounting of potential results in terms of making countries malaria-free. No investigation of what has worked in countries that did recently go malaria-free. The title suggests that malaria is all about killing mosquitoes, but that is misleading. [...]

    2. On page 166 the author quotes somebody saying something like this"Friend, you don't even know the life cycle of malaria." I commented to myself, "Neither do I, and I only have 30 some pages before this book is over!" This was a book about the economics of eliminating malaria, and it left me wondering how we have mosquitoes in our country but not malaria. The author failed to explain the basics of this disease before roaring into how to "Change the World."

    3. Did not meet expectations. Something of a hagiography of Ray Chambers - missing the "what's next?" element. I fall into the Dambisa Moyo camp - quoting Jeffrey Sachs doesn't help my frame of mind when reading this book. Still - it's a nice idea.

    4. This was a revealing tale of the attempt to eliminate child malaria deaths by the end of 2015. I found the book was wide-ranging and readable.That date is days away, and that objective has not been achieved. However, child malaria deaths have been halved since 2000.Ray Chambers and the Malaria No More movement can take credit for saving millions of lives so far.I found this book informative, not a glory piece about Ray Chambers, and not taking the line that only business people have the ability [...]

    5. Very disappointing. This is not a book about malaria. It is a book about how rich businessmen are much smarter, more charitable and all round more valuable human beings than the rest of us. Nations and their elected representatives should just get out of the way and let businessmen set up everything according to a "business model," (structure of which is never really elaborated, but it's a damn sight better than what those stupid African politicians could come up with) and then malaria can be el [...]

    6. Good book about a recent attempt to eradicate malaria and what does and does not work in the world of international aid. Reads a bit more like a long newspaper article than a book, but I stayed interested.

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