Three Philosophical Poets: Lucretius, Dante And Goethe

Three Philosophical Poets Lucretius Dante And Goethe This scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series In the interest of creating a extensive selection of rare historical book reprints we have chosen to reproduce this title

  • Title: Three Philosophical Poets: Lucretius, Dante And Goethe
  • Author: George Santayana
  • ISBN: 9781430471318
  • Page: 227
  • Format: Paperback
  • This scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series In the interest of creating a extensive selection of rare historical book reprints, we have chosen to reproduce this title even though it may possibly have occasional imperfections such as missing and blurred pages, missing text, poor pictures, markings, dark backgrounds and other reproductThis scarce antiquarian book is included in our special Legacy Reprint Series In the interest of creating a extensive selection of rare historical book reprints, we have chosen to reproduce this title even though it may possibly have occasional imperfections such as missing and blurred pages, missing text, poor pictures, markings, dark backgrounds and other reproduction issues beyond our control Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as a part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world s literature.

    One thought on “Three Philosophical Poets: Lucretius, Dante And Goethe”

    1. This book is foul. Not the text especially but its self. It literally makes me sneeze it's so grotty and old. I read some article in the Berkeley Philosophy Journal Qui Parle a while back which sort of pegged George Santanyana as a politically indifferent Bourgeois Classicist, and maybe he is. I really don't think any sort of direct critique of thought or people or anything is very interesting anyway, as if Nature's true meaning can be just 'had out' by some yapping grad-student Just look at lan [...]

    2. I guess one could fairly call Santayana a kind of bougie hedge-artist, and I guess that would be sort of correct. He's concerned with aesthetics, definitely, and the metaphysics of creating, and if he preferred to tie his tie on and contemplate Dante on a yacht instead of politicizing his arguments, well, it certainly doesn't endear him to me personally, but nor does it make his work any less important or engaging. Santayana's apolitical aesthetic sense is unfashionable nowadays but has its defe [...]

    3. I have only read the introduction and the third of the book that is about Dante; but it is excellent. I knew very little about Santayana, other than the famous quote about being doomed to relive history; but he was apparently very well known for his artful prose and his witty quotes. He does not fail to deliver in this book. He makes fun of Plato's insistence on emphasizing final causes for objects found in the real world, saying that it leads to ideas like: the reason we have very long intestin [...]

    4. Refreshingly good read. The chapter on Lucretius is masterful. The invocation of the future master poet, who will synthesize the sentiments and visions of the three discussed philosopical po, is gripping.

    5. The book adds absolutely nothing to my understanding of the three poets, beyond what I could gather by just reading the original texts on my own. Adds no value to the canon.

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