The Singing Fish

The Singing Fish Fiction The interwoven tales that make up THE SINGING FISH are not told but rather spun from a primal almost child like source of mythic language sublimated from the fundamental building blocks of mu

  • Title: The Singing Fish
  • Author: Peter Markus
  • ISBN: 9780974605388
  • Page: 446
  • Format: Paperback
  • Fiction The interwoven tales that make up THE SINGING FISH are not told but rather spun from a primal, almost child like source of mythic language sublimated from the fundamental building blocks of mud, brother, river, girl, moon, fish and a rusted nail Peter Markus gorgeously spare, riverine fables of brotherly sweetness and violence are hypnotic, haunting, and sublimFiction The interwoven tales that make up THE SINGING FISH are not told but rather spun from a primal, almost child like source of mythic language sublimated from the fundamental building blocks of mud, brother, river, girl, moon, fish and a rusted nail Peter Markus gorgeously spare, riverine fables of brotherly sweetness and violence are hypnotic, haunting, and sublime Gary Lutz There is an obsessive quality about Peter Markus writing that I am obsessed with and a musicality that I cannot get out of my head The fish are singing and Peter Markus is too Michael Kimball.

    One thought on “The Singing Fish”

    1. Mud.Brother.Fish.River.Girl.Hands.Fishheads.Claw hammer.Moon.Mud.River.Song.Boy.Rusty nails.Brother.Mud.Fish.Brother. Mud.Clipped, unadorned sentences lay out a highly insular vision, nearly insane or autistic or just totally existing by its own hidden rules. The repetitions create a sort of order, but there's never any hint of insight, just sparks of violence or beauty immediately swallowed up by mud. Given that this seems to be an extension of his first book, and that his story "Dead Dog Sleep [...]

    2. The more I read of Peter Markus, the more innovative I find his work and his use of repetition. I can���t remember whether it was this summer or last Christmas, but a friend of mine lent me one or two of Peter Markus���s books, The Singing Fish and/or Good, Brother. I was hesitant at first because the writing was so strange and full of repetition that seemed almost childish. It was strange writing, and for that reason, I don���t expect anything written in this style to ever be [...]

    3. Another really interesting Calamari book that is hard to describe, but here's my attempt: Imagine that Faulkner's Vardaman (from As I Lay Dying) grew up to become a character in a Beckett play, and that might come close to what the narrator's voice is like.And something about its cyclical nature and the repetition reminds me of a sestina. Can one write a sestina novella? It seems perhaps Peter Markus has. Shelftalker: "This book has been haunting me in the best way -- its rhythms get stuck in my [...]

    4. One of my favorite examples of relentless prose and musical authorship, this book is like a second of time that isn't going forwards or backwards, but both directions at once. An endless eternity guided by the brothers and the water and the mud and the fish and the headless boy and girl. Father with nails and mother with soapy buckets. I read this book over and over again, in little pieces all the time.

    5. I found this immensely satisfying, found myself reading certain stories aloud to more experience the beauty of the language. I also liked that certain pieces were revisited, giving a hypnotic spiraling effect. Wonderful read.

    6. It's a bit dense, and the creator's attention seems at times to concentrate too much on the tactile side, ruminating on the texture of his words and sentences themselves. Still, at times The Singing Fish can be very affecting in mysterious ways.

    7. this is some sweet sweet mud music right here. it's all rhythm and rust. it's like a myth you didn't quite grow up in, but wish you had, and i like that

    8. An excellent oddment. Regard my brief critique of his Good, Brother. Rearrange the words and letters if you like. It will mean more or less the same thing. Or, if you prefer, ditto.

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