Reactions: The Private Life of Atoms

Reactions The Private Life of Atoms Illustrated with remarkable new full color images one or on every page and written by one of the world s leading authorities on the subject Reactions offers a compact pain free tour of the inner wor

  • Title: Reactions: The Private Life of Atoms
  • Author: Peter Atkins
  • ISBN: 9780199695126
  • Page: 367
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Illustrated with remarkable new full color images one or on every page and written by one of the world s leading authorities on the subject, Reactions offers a compact, pain free tour of the inner workings of chemistry Reactions begins with the chemical formula almost everyone knows the formula for water, H2O a molecule with an almost laughably simple chemical cIllustrated with remarkable new full color images one or on every page and written by one of the world s leading authorities on the subject, Reactions offers a compact, pain free tour of the inner workings of chemistry Reactions begins with the chemical formula almost everyone knows the formula for water, H2O a molecule with an almost laughably simple chemical composition But Peter Atkins shows that water is also rather miraculous it is the only substance whose solid form is less dense than its liquid hence ice floats in water and incredibly central to many chemical reactions, as it is an excellent solvent, being able to dissolve gases and many solids Moreover, Atkins tells us that water is actually chemically aggressive, and can react with and destroy the compounds dissolved in it, and he also shows us what happens at the molecular level when water turns to ice and when it melts Moving beyond water, Atkins slowly builds up a toolkit of basic chemical processes, including precipitation perhaps the simplest of all chemical reactions , combustion, reduction, corrosion, electrolysis, and catalysis He then shows how these fundamental tools can be brought together in complex processes such as photosynthesis, radical polymerization, vision, enzyme control, and synthesis Peter Atkins is a world renowned chemist who has taught at Oxford for decades and has an established track record as a popular science writer In this crystal clear, attractively illustrated, and insightful volume, Atkins treats the reader to a fantastic introductory tour in just a few hundred colorful and lively pages.

    One thought on “Reactions: The Private Life of Atoms”

    1. Like any other medium, from newspapers to blockbuster movies, popular science books tend to follow trends. I'm delighted to say that this is a book that breaks most of the current trends - it is probably the most different popular science book I've seen in a number of years.Firstly, it concentrates on chemistry, the Cinderella of the sciences (at least from the point of view of popular science writing). If you aren't dealing with the elements, chemistry generally gets a very rough ride. But Pete [...]

    2. Unfortunately, despite looking pretty inviting in the bookstore, this title left me fairly cold.This is the fourth of Atkins's popular science titles I've read, and I expect it to be the last. Only his Molecules really worked for me. (Though his Atoms, Molecules, and Change is a superior effort to this one.) I identify a few flaws with this book:1) The presentation of information is too unsystematic.2) The diagrams are not particularly helpful. Atkins uses ball-and-stick molecular diagrams but n [...]

    3. I really wanted to like this book, but Atkins could have made it a bit more accessible for those outside of the Chemistry/Science world. It is easy to get lost in the formulas and jargon. With that said, I found it interesting and worth the fumbling around.

    4. The nitty-gritty (and sometimes technical) descriptions of reactions both familiar and unfamiliar. Why does a catalytic converter stop working? How do you digest food? How does photosynthesis work? These are answered not in a language someone without any prior science exposure can easily decode, but anyone who took chemistry and biology in high school will get something out of this. Mostly dry, but told in quick chapters to keep the interest of the reader.

    5. I found this book extremely interesting and I'm glad I had decided to read it. I really enjoyed how easy it was to understand considering I don't know a ton about chemistry. That being said, there were some parts that were a little bit confusing, what with all of the formulas and stuff. Despite this, I really wish I could give this book 4.5 stars, because that's how I feel.

    6. I agree with Todd's, G. Braden's, and Brian's reviews below, so I won't repeat what they have said :-) my copy, however, seems to have a lot of editorial errors in it regarding word tense and sentence structure. I did get a brand new copy from a popular used book reseller 🤔 The illustrations were especially formidable👍

    7. Atkins does a wonderful job of explaining difficult subjects. His illustrations are good, esp, if viewed in color (better on iPad than Kindle). Highly recommended for beginning students in Chem, Organic Chem, and Biochem to clarify, simplify, and organize your thinking about reactions.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *