The Woman Who Thought too Much: A Memoir

The Woman Who Thought too Much A Memoir Joanne Limburg thinks things she doesn t want to think and does things she doesn t want to do As a young woman obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours had come to completely dominate her life S

  • Title: The Woman Who Thought too Much: A Memoir
  • Author: Joanne Limburg
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 376
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Joanne Limburg thinks things she doesn t want to think, and does things she doesn t want to do As a young woman, obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours had come to completely dominate her life She knew that something was wrong, but it would take many painful years of searching to find someone who could explain her symptoms The Woman Who Thought Too Much is a vivJoanne Limburg thinks things she doesn t want to think, and does things she doesn t want to do As a young woman, obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours had come to completely dominate her life She knew that something was wrong, but it would take many painful years of searching to find someone who could explain her symptoms The Woman Who Thought Too Much is a vividly honest, beautifully told and darkly witty memoir about the quest to understand and manage a life with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

    One thought on “The Woman Who Thought too Much: A Memoir”

    1. As someone with personal experience of OCD, I get extremely cross about the way it is misrepresented. OCD isn’t about being tidy and organised. OCD sufferers have intrusive thoughts and obsessions and often feel compelled to carry out an action, such as reciting something or touching something, in order to make those thoughts go away. For Limburg, OCD manifests itself in obsessive thoughts about the danger inherent in everything. She sees danger in normal everyday things and obsesses over it, [...]

    2. Have you ever had a thought which kept going round and round in your head? Even if you know the thought or the idea is stupid you still can’t get rid of it. There is no way you can reason with this idea and banish it so that you can get on with your life. All of us must at some time had the occasional idea or thought which won’t be banished. But the author has lived with obsessional thoughts for the whole of her life and she has had professional help of various kinds over the years to try an [...]

    3. ‘I obsessed about all kinds of things’Joanne Limburg was a fearless child, a champion tree climber at the age of seven, who became an adolescent fearful of walking down stairs. Somehow, by the time she went to Cambridge to study, Ms Limburg was governed by obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). What happened to Ms Limburg? And, importantly, how did she learn to live with OCD in order to have become an accomplished (and published) poet, wife and mother?'I don’t want to die, but I feared for m [...]

    4. Joanne Limburg writes her memoir about her years living with OCD, being a teenager when it started, trying to get her phd, or a steady job, finding someone who would marry her and raising her son.I really loved this book! I loved her research, her unredemptive ending and her honesty about how the disease affected her. it is not a self-help book. Some OCD sufferers may be worse off, some may be better, others may not have been diagnosed but may find that now they have a reason to seek help. Or no [...]

    5. The author was very forthright in her journey with OCD. I appreciated her honesty and tenacity. What could have been a crippling situation for her instead gave her the increasing will to conquer and overcome her obstacles. The author is brave to share her story in an intimate and uncensored manner.

    6. I do not understand the school system in England, and the author has not given me much of a glimpse into why she has the thoughts or actions that she does. The author just seems like a depressed, anxious teenager. I am not engaged and don't plan to finish reading this book.

    7. An honest and interesting read, although bordering on reading like a text book at times. Given the author's drive for perfectionism, all the way through I was wondering how she managed to get the book written let alone critiqued and published.

    8. Very interesting yet lost the autobiographical nature towards the end which I had found so emotive and personal. Such books are incredibly important in abolishing mental illness stereotypes and I can imagine this story being difficult to write.

    9. I feel like I should be enjoying this more than I am - perhaps it's the wrong time for me to be reading it. May set it aside

    10. I found this difficult to read because I know somebody who suffers from severe OCD. It was however vey helpful,I would recommend it to OCD sufferers and their family/friends/carers etc.

    11. I was left feeling like i was sneaking on someone's private matters but also admired her for her patience.

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