After the Bombs

After the Bombs After the Bombs is a coming of age story that holds a mirror up to the modern history of Guatemala a funhouse mirror of richly inventive and farcical black comedy which provides a better description o

  • Title: After the Bombs
  • Author: Arturo Arias Asa Zatz
  • ISBN: 9780915306893
  • Page: 485
  • Format: Paperback
  • After the Bombs is a coming of age story that holds a mirror up to the modern history of Guatemala a funhouse mirror of richly inventive and farcical black comedy which provides a better description of life in that country than any history book ever could It opens with the bombing of Guatemala City in 1954 when the hero, Max, is a small child In a swiftly moving narratiAfter the Bombs is a coming of age story that holds a mirror up to the modern history of Guatemala a funhouse mirror of richly inventive and farcical black comedy which provides a better description of life in that country than any history book ever could It opens with the bombing of Guatemala City in 1954 when the hero, Max, is a small child In a swiftly moving narrative, Max journeys twoard adulthood, searching for his identitty, for his father, and along the way, for the real Guatemala and the possibility of a society founded on human decency, after the bombs.

    One thought on “After the Bombs”

    1. This is my original review published in the San Francisco Chronicle in 1990:AFTER THE BOMBSBy Arturo Arias, translated by Asa ZatzCurbstone; 221 pages; $ 10.95Arturo Arias, a Guatemalan writer who lives and teaches in Texas, works a vein of fiction that might be called Death Squad Realism.Beyond the magical realism of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and other Latin American writers, Arias offers a novel piled relentlessly high with dismembered bodies and the stench of death. He loads ''After the Bombs'' [...]

    2. A remarkably assured first novel. After the bombs renders, in resonant magical realism, the damage done at all levels of Guatemalan society by the 1954 US bombing in protection of corporate interests (that is, United Fruit). Arias juggles horror and humor winningly, and takes us via fantasy to the core of a harsh Central American reality.

    3. Without a good sese of Guatemalan history this book would probably be confusing and boring, I´m sure there were some parts to it that were completely over my head. This book was ok, I wasn´t a fan of the beginning of the book but I´m glad I pushed on.

    4. a story about a boy growing up in the midst of war in guatemala. a little difficult to read, as there really isnt much proper sentence structure, nor quotation marks. but definitely a wonderful story none the less.

    5. Not my favorite. Couldn't get into the chaotic narrative and lack of punctuation, and some of the more brutal scenes were really difficult for me to read.

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