Islamic Art and Architecture

Islamic Art and Architecture From the supreme confidence of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem to the scores of exquisite buildings of Ottoman Istanbul from the extraordinary virtuosity of Persian painting in the fifteenth century

  • Title: Islamic Art and Architecture
  • Author: Robert Hillenbrand
  • ISBN: 9780500203057
  • Page: 133
  • Format: Paperback
  • From the supreme confidence of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem to the scores of exquisite buildings of Ottoman Istanbul from the extraordinary virtuosity of Persian painting in the fifteenth century to the vivid ceramic tradition of Ottoman Iznik Hillenbrand does justice to both the highlights and the ongoing evolution of the full range of Islamic arts Supported by a gFrom the supreme confidence of the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem to the scores of exquisite buildings of Ottoman Istanbul from the extraordinary virtuosity of Persian painting in the fifteenth century to the vivid ceramic tradition of Ottoman Iznik Hillenbrand does justice to both the highlights and the ongoing evolution of the full range of Islamic arts Supported by a glossary of Islamic terms, a time line, and maps, this book traces the architecture, calligraphy, book illumination, painting, ceramics, textiles, and metalwork of a vastly accomplished and influential civilization.

    One thought on “Islamic Art and Architecture”

    1. This is a truly illuminating survey, written in a lively, forthright style that captures the author's character and perspective without undercutting the book's objective task. (I especially enjoyed Hillenbrand's use of a delightfully broad vocabulary, that kept even this English M.A. thumbing his dictionary!) I was grateful for Hillenbrand's wide range in describing metalwork, pottery, textiles, book illustrations (those dreaded "minor arts"), as well as archtecture.

    2. This book is very comprehensive and well-organized on the world of islamic art--an often very-little studied area in the art world. I read it after hearing a series of Hildebrand's lectures in an art history class at the University of Edinburgh. This man is an amazing speaker and so passionate and extremely knowledgeable about what he does.

    3. Another book for school. This one was for the History of Islamic art and though I found the contents interesting and helpful for the class I found the information difficult to read and dry. There is no way to make art interesting for non artists however I feel for an american class the book which is written in a proper english style was quite hard to get into and the word use didn't always make sense to me (dang my poor education) Over all though it was great. Just wish the images were better.

    4. Hillenbrand's book is great. It is comprehensive, well written, includes helpful maps, timelines, and photographs that capture the beauty of the art he discusses. He covers everything from painting, to calligraphy, to the beautiful Persian rugs, to architecture. If you're interested in any kind of art, I would highly recommend!

    5. The illustrations are good and the information comprehensive and presumably accurate, but somehow the text manages to make a deeply interesting subjective sound deadly boring. Written in a tedious, pedantic style that taxes the reader's patience.

    6. Lots of interesting information, but written in a pretty dry language. All the photos are black and white and of poor quality.

    7. For the Summer Course I am TA-ing, but still a very interesting introductory look at Islamic Art. The only issue is that the text excludes Islamic art of India.

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