Aetius: Attila's Nemesis

Aetius Attila s Nemesis In AD Attila with a huge force composed of Huns allies and vassals drawn from his already vast empire was rampaging westward across Gaul essentially modern France then still nominally part of

  • Title: Aetius: Attila's Nemesis
  • Author: Ian Hughes
  • ISBN: 9781848842793
  • Page: 225
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In AD 453 Attila, with a huge force composed of Huns, allies and vassals drawn from his already vast empire, was rampaging westward across Gaul essentially modern France , then still nominally part of the Western Roman Empire Laying siege to Orleans, he was only a few days march from extending his empire from the Eurasian steppe to the Atlantic He was brought to battleIn AD 453 Attila, with a huge force composed of Huns, allies and vassals drawn from his already vast empire, was rampaging westward across Gaul essentially modern France , then still nominally part of the Western Roman Empire Laying siege to Orleans, he was only a few days march from extending his empire from the Eurasian steppe to the Atlantic He was brought to battle on the Cataluanian Plain and defeated by a coalition hastily assembled and led by Aetius Who was this man that saved Western Europe from the Hunnic yoke While Attila is a household name, his nemesis remains relatively obscureVIEWS.a lively, often insightful account of the declining years of Roman power in the West which will be of interest to students of Roman history, the onset of the Dark ages and early Byzantine history.NYMAS

    One thought on “Aetius: Attila's Nemesis”

    1. The thing I like best about Hughes' books is that they hone in on one historical figure. Most historians would shy away from that, at least at that time in history. I had read other books about the era, which would mention Aetius, but they always focussed on the broader subject and didn't really give a chronology of some of the major players. For this reason, I also recommend his book "Stilicho," who is another person that comes up frequently but not enough to get a sense of who he was.The only [...]

    2. this book covers the life of Aetius and the trials he and the Western Empire faced. As explained in the Prologue of the book the sources are extremely limited. The author explains what the sources say and then the probabilities of various theories on what happened at the time. I found this extremely useful as it didn't purport these as facts.I would recommend this book to anyone who like me has little knowledge of the late empire.

    3. A well written and delightful addition to my book shelf. Huges does an excellent job in narrating the life of one of the oft forgotten Roman hero's of the 5th Century. This is no small feat considering the scarcity of sources which requires Hughes to formulate some very convincing and well thought hypotheses. Though I would not necessarily agree with all these hypotheses I can never the less see where the author is coming from and will make a fine foundation for future works in this area. I woul [...]

    4. I kind of liked it for the subject matter and because it is difficult to find good books on this person. But the writing style is not great to be honest.

    5. Ian Hughes starts his foreword with the quote: “Historians of the fourth and fifth centuries have a particularly difficult life. Those used to the relative certainties of the late republic and early empire can only look on with admiration at those brave souls who plunge into the mess that is late antiquity.” He refers partly to the fact that “everyone writing in this period had an agenda in which the accurate reporting of events was either irrelevant at best, or at worst something to be av [...]

    6. Aetius is the figure upon whom historians have bestowed the incurably romantic title of "The Last of the Romans", although author Ian Hughes eschews that cliché for the subtitle "Attila's Nemesis". I had read and been impressed by the author's previous book about Stilicho, but I actually liked this one more. Possibly that was because, despite Mr. Hughes' efforts to rehabilitate Stilicho's reputation, Aetius comes over as a more admirable character. Also from the perspective of nearly 1700 years [...]

    7. Hughes did a great job making a coherent narrative out of the limited and confusing primary sources. Unfortunately, too often his obvious hero worship of Aetius bleeds though and when two competing interpretations of an event are offered, the most pro-Aetius version is what he considers to be correct. It began to bother me somewhat when he would say, "it could be interpreted that Aetius was responsible for so and so's assassination, but this isn't likely" without explaining why, exactly, it isn' [...]

    8. Academic, but still quite readable biography of Aetius, the last great (Western) Roman general, who defeated Attila the Hun. The sources for this time period are sparse and suspect. Hughes leads us through the fog, pointing out the shadows that may look like something they are not. He is careful to state when he is speculating and why he comes to the conclusions he does. In the end, we know little about Aetius the man, but can extrapolate from his actions. This is useful work for anyone interest [...]

    9. Ian Hughes wrote a fascinating book on one of the most intriguing (and little know) people from the Roman Empire. His research was incredible and the results were laid out in a clear and interesting manner. I thought I was knowledgeable about Aetius from the research I conducted for my alternative history novel "The Red Fist of Rome". This author left me in awe.

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