Pure Pleasure: A Guide to the Twentieth Century's Most Enjoyable Books

Pure Pleasure A Guide to the Twentieth Century s Most Enjoyable Books In Pure Pleasure John Carey one of Britain s most respected literary critics introduces us to what he believes are the fifty most enjoyable books of the twentieth century based on sheer reading ple

  • Title: Pure Pleasure: A Guide to the Twentieth Century's Most Enjoyable Books
  • Author: John Carey
  • ISBN: 9780571204489
  • Page: 183
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Pure Pleasure, John Carey, one of Britain s most respected literary critics, introduces us to what he believes are the fifty most enjoyable books of the twentieth century based on sheer reading pleasure Mixing fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, Carey includes literary heavyweights like James Joyce, Thomas Mann, and T S Eliot, as well as populist writers like ArthuIn Pure Pleasure, John Carey, one of Britain s most respected literary critics, introduces us to what he believes are the fifty most enjoyable books of the twentieth century based on sheer reading pleasure Mixing fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, Carey includes literary heavyweights like James Joyce, Thomas Mann, and T S Eliot, as well as populist writers like Arthur Conan Doyle, Kingsley Amis, and John Updike Carey also discusses masterpieces like F Scott Fitzgerald s The Great Gatsby and Gunter Grass s The Tin Drum, alongside lesser known works like D H Lawrence s Twilight in Italy and George Orwell s Coming Up for Air.In a series of intelligent and fast moving essays each devoted to a single book Carey mixes criticism, biography, and cultural context about each selection with illuminations on the author s inspiration and how each work was written The end result is a book that no one who is passionate about reading should be without.

    One thought on “Pure Pleasure: A Guide to the Twentieth Century's Most Enjoyable Books”

    1. Somewhere else on this site, and undoubtedly at several other locations on the web, there is that infamous list. You know the one. The one that makes us all feel like semi-literate philistines. 1,001 books you Should Read Before You Die. (Or was that 10,001?) Compiled by the self-anointed, self-important guardians of the shrine of high literature. People whose primary goal seems to have been to make us all feel bad about ourselves."Pure Pleasure", John Carey's "guide to the 20th century's most e [...]

    2. I acquired this book through a recommendation that I have subsequently forgotten, but for which I am thankful nonetheless.John Carey, whose fine book The Intellectuals and the Masses (St. Martin's 1993) I read some years ago, has prepared a guide to the "most enjoyable books" of the twentieth century.While tastes may differ I find I have already read almost half of the fifty books he lists and of those there is only one that I remember not enjoying. Based on that evidence and the books I have en [...]

    3. In these short pieces originally featured in the Sunday Times, Carey chooses a chronological and personal selection of 50 works of fiction, memoir and poetry of the 20th century. Thankfully, Carey's choices reflect his own reading biases and are not even remotely similar to those awful 1000 Books to Read Before You Die lists that have the air of being generated by marketing department drones in publishing houses. (Or maybe they should now be called "media conglomerates"?)American readers may fin [...]

    4. If I could see one book given out free to every home with the weekly newspaper, it would be this one. Fifty short, beautifully written essays on Carey's favourite books. At the time of publication, 'greatest of' lists were everywhere, all looking, as Carey says, like term reports intended for the Almighty to let Him know well His children were doing on the cultural front. It was pretty clear a lot of titles were being thrown in less for the pleasure they have given, and more to lend false swank [...]

    5. Pure pleasure us such an apt title for John Carey's collection of Essays about 50 books he loves. Some of the books I knew already and Carey opened rates to new depths. Some I had heard of but dismissed as " probably boring or just not for me" and Carey persuaded me to think again. A miscellany of fiction, poetry and a smattering of autobiography, I think that this is a book I will want to dip into many times over as I seek out or revisit some of the gems he has chosen. None of these books are o [...]

    6. Book lovers! Here's a place to find something for you "to read" list that hasn't crossed your mind. Plus the great pleasure of finding a vigorous appreciate review of a book you love. For me, Huxley's These Barren Leaves goes on the "to read" list. And of old favorites, I loved Carey's review of The Good Soldier Svejk.

    7. I enjoyed this collection of reviews by one of Britain's top book critics - and added many of his suggestions to my to-read list!

    8. I like book lists (I cannot deny) and this is a good one: most enjoyable (rather than best) books of the twentieth century and the reasoning thereby. Mr Carey appears to be well-educated and thoughtful and knowledgeable but also comes across as a person who really likes reading as well. He summarises beautifully: his chapters on Yeats and Mansfield are excellent and give insights that explain aspects of their work succinctly and he gets what makes some authors more accessible than others perfect [...]

    9. John Carey is a British literary critic and here he brings us brief reviews of 50 favorite books. He often chooses one of the lesser known works of a well known author, thus reminding the reader of someone they are familiar with but leading them to a previously undiscovered work. About 1/4 of the reviews concern poets. I will be checking out some of his suggestions.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *