Basho and the River Stones

Basho and the River Stones The great poet Basho lives in the woods and shares the cherries from his cherry tree with the local foxes But one tricky fox becomes greedy He uses his magic to turn three river stones into gold coins

  • Title: Basho and the River Stones
  • Author: Tim J. Myers Oki S. Han
  • ISBN: 9780761451655
  • Page: 154
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The great poet Basho lives in the woods and shares the cherries from his cherry tree with the local foxes But one tricky fox becomes greedy He uses his magic to turn three river stones into gold coins, and then tricks Basho into giving up all of the cherries When the fox returns to gloat over his victory, he discovers that Basho is content Wiser than the fox, Basho knoThe great poet Basho lives in the woods and shares the cherries from his cherry tree with the local foxes But one tricky fox becomes greedy He uses his magic to turn three river stones into gold coins, and then tricks Basho into giving up all of the cherries When the fox returns to gloat over his victory, he discovers that Basho is content Wiser than the fox, Basho knows that a poem inspired by the beauty of the river stones is valuable than gold Oki S Han s watercolors evoke ancient Japan in this sequel to the New York Times bestseller Basho and the Fox.

    One thought on “Basho and the River Stones”

    1. this is the first children's book I've purchased for my kindle fire and I did so because of the presence of the name of Basho, the Japanese poet of ancient times, in the title. After sampling the book, seeing the colorful Japanese-inspired illustrations and fable-like story, I couldn't let the the lack of a child in my household stand in the way! So glad I got this for myself. It's a simple story that I will enjoy many times.Recommended to the children in all of you.

    2. I was disappointed that there were only 2 haiku in the story; however, they are exemplars of haiku principles. The story reads like folklore and the illustrations are lovely.

    3. Bash and the River Stones is an ideal book to use when referencing the aesthetic question of, "What is Beauty?" Basho, a simple man who lives humbly as a poet in the lands of Japan, is fooled by a fox who bribes him of his beautiful cherry tree with three gold coins. The coins are in fact river stones that have been momentarily transformed by the fox. Although Basho was fooled, he quickly recalls that beauty lies within nature and the art of poetry. When Basho discovers a beautiful poem that he [...]

    4. Basho and the River Stones by Tim Myers with illustrations done by Oki s Han is a book honoring the Japanese poet Basho. There is a great mix of cultural generality and specifics. The plot includes traditional Japanese myths like foxes being tricksters. The names things and places are encountered in Japanese and then explained; Fuka River, there was great wa or harmony, look like a yamabushi or wandering monk. The words rhythm and rhymes all seem to be authentic. There is a time period (long ago [...]

    5. This story uses elements of folklore and haiku to weave together a new fictional story with the famous Japanese poet Matsuo Basho (he lived over 400 years ago and helped develop the modern interpretation of haiku poetry) as the protagonist. The story also pays tribute to the ancient Japanese belief that foxes were magical and meeting one was adventurous.In the story, the trickster fox learns his lesson through Basho's kindness. And, through Basho's character and the foxes determination to make a [...]

    6. I think the author Tim Meyers has done a good job capturing the essence of a Japanese folktale, while creating something quite original. This tale is many things: an introduction to Haiku, Japanese language, mythology, but more than anything it is a wonderful story of friendship. The book also stresses the importance of art over money, but does so in a balanced, humorous way. Even poets have to eat! Although it may be a little text heavy for younger readers, the evocative illustrations and cleve [...]

    7. A fictional folk-lore tale about a real historical character. Basho was the father of modern day haiku. The story and art were excellent and we were glad for this introduction to haiku which we plan to follow up with some of Basho's own works. He's still considered the greatest haiku poet of all time!Thanks for the recommendation, Diane. I hope the kids ask for it to be read again!

    8. While not as good as Tim Myer's first book (Basho and the Fox), this is still an engaging tale of the continuing relationship between Basho the Japanese poet and the foxes. This time, a wily fox doesn't want to share the delicious cherries with Basho any more so he tricks him into agreeing to give all the cherries away. Lovely illustrations with some nice haikus thrown in to boot!

    9. While not a collection of poems, this story nevertheless contains several poems written in the haiku style of much of Basho's poetry. I read it to a group of first grade students who were much intrigued. And spent time afterwards writing their own haiku.

    10. This one I think is even better than Basho and the Foxes. I love the way the author of these stories incorporates some of Basho's actual haiku into the stories. Absolutely wonderful. I'd read these even if I didn't have a kid.

    11. Messages: Inspiration is more valuable than money. It's noble to refuse charity. Be content with what you have. Vehicle: Ancient Japanese legend.Important words learned by my four year old: Poet, monk, haiku. Four year old's favorite part: The fox tricked him!

    12. This story talks about loyalty. This teaches children about being loyal and be a good friend.Teachers can ask students to write about what makes a good friend. They can talk about how they treat their friends. Sometimes stones are better than money

    13. When some foxes decide they want all the cherries from the poet Basho's cherry tree, one of the foxes magically transforms himself into a wandering monk in order to trick the poet. But things take a surprising turn as magic gives way to trickery!

    14. Lovely illustrations invite the reader to share a magical story, one where we appreciate what we have, share with others, and create harmony.

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