The Total Art of Stalinism: Avant-Garde, Aesthetic Dictatorship, and Beyond

The Total Art of Stalinism Avant Garde Aesthetic Dictatorship and Beyond As communism collapses into ruins Boris Groys provokes our interest in the aesthetic goals pursued with such catastrophic consequences by its founders Interpreting totalitarian art and literature in

  • Title: The Total Art of Stalinism: Avant-Garde, Aesthetic Dictatorship, and Beyond
  • Author: Boris Groys
  • ISBN: 9780691055961
  • Page: 352
  • Format: Hardcover
  • As communism collapses into ruins, Boris Groys provokes our interest in the aesthetic goals pursued with such catastrophic consequences by its founders Interpreting totalitarian art and literature in the context of cultural history, this brilliant essay likens totalitarian aims to the modernists demands that art should move from depicting to transforming the world The rAs communism collapses into ruins, Boris Groys provokes our interest in the aesthetic goals pursued with such catastrophic consequences by its founders Interpreting totalitarian art and literature in the context of cultural history, this brilliant essay likens totalitarian aims to the modernists demands that art should move from depicting to transforming the world The revolutionaries of October 1917 promised to create a society that was not only just and economically stable but also beautiful, and they intended that the entire life of the nation be completely subordinate to Communist party leaders commissioned to regulate, harmonize, and create a single artistic whole out of even the most minute details What were the origins of this idea And what were its artistic and literary ramifications In addressing these issues, Groys questions the view that socialist realism was an art for the masses Groys argues instead that the total art proposed by Stalin and his followers was formulated by well educated elites who had assimilated the experience of the avant garde and been brought to socialist realism by the future oriented logic of avant garde thinking After explaining the internal evolution of Stalinist art, Groys shows how socialist realism gradually disintegrated after Stalin s death In an undecided and insecure Soviet culture, artists focused on restoring historical continuity or practicing sots art, a term derived from the combined names of socialist realism sotsrealizm and pop art Increasingly popular in the West, sots artists incorporate the Stalin myth into world mythology and demonstrate its similarity to supposedly opposing myths.

    One thought on “The Total Art of Stalinism: Avant-Garde, Aesthetic Dictatorship, and Beyond”

    1. This study is itself a complete work of art, written in a compelling style and filled to the brim with counter-intuitive insights . . . and yet it strangely turns things on their head by positing aesthetic discourse as the primary driving spirit behind developments in Soviet history.

    2. ART AS A POSTSCRIPT KOMUNSTIČKIBoris Groys / ART UTOPIABoris Groys in circles of philosophers, aestheticians and art historians as one of the most influential theorists of post-modernity. Veovatno that his back ground intellectually, a mathematician by training, linguist, semiotician would say we have a vocation; affect the precision of the analytical approach to the work of art in the book before us: "The Art of Utopia." About that Boris will say that is a collection of essays, written laconic [...]

    3. I will add more to this review in time, but suffice it to say this book, which for a long while has been considered the final word on Socialist Realism alongside Katerina Clark's magnificent "The Soviet Novel", is at best misguided and often delusional. Operating from stereotypes about the period and his not-so-subtle disdain for the Soviet Union, Groys makes increasingly wild assertions (and almost always without citations) to paint socialist realism as entirely based in the will of a single in [...]

    4. This is a clever, provocative book. The argument that Stalinism is the heir of the avant-garde desire to erase boundary between art and everyday life and to radically reshape society is quite interesting. It does a very good job of debunking the 'myth of the innocent avant-garde.' But I think Groys' argument is perhaps a bit too simplistic and runs rough shod over the liberatory potential of Russian avant-garde currents. In this sense the stripping away and reduction of the avant-garde during th [...]

    5. Most things seem mussed in this book -- I'm not so sure if Groys truly understands and delineates the various long words and seemingly tough categories he deploys here -- except for his discreet dislike of Stalin and his era. And even regarding that part -- that dislike -- Groys seems non-committal to elaborate. His words are left scattered then in the end. And the mess does not do anything

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *