The Prodigal Troll

The Prodigal Troll The Prodigal Troll is a tale of a human child raised by a band of mythological creatures that is both hysterical and moving When Lord Gruethrist s castle is laid under siege by an invading baron he s

  • Title: The Prodigal Troll
  • Author: Charles Coleman Finlay
  • ISBN: 9781591023326
  • Page: 444
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Prodigal Troll is a tale of a human child raised by a band of mythological creatures that is both hysterical and moving.When Lord Gruethrist s castle is laid under siege by an invading baron, he sends a trusted knight and nursemaid off with his infant son Their escape across a wilderness landscape populated by fantastic creatures and torn by war takes unexpected turnsThe Prodigal Troll is a tale of a human child raised by a band of mythological creatures that is both hysterical and moving.When Lord Gruethrist s castle is laid under siege by an invading baron, he sends a trusted knight and nursemaid off with his infant son Their escape across a wilderness landscape populated by fantastic creatures and torn by war takes unexpected turns until the baby is finally adopted by a mother troll grieving for her own lost child Christened Maggot by a hostile stepfather, the human boy grows up amid the crude but democratic trolls until he leaves the band to rediscover the world of humankind.But the world of man is a complex and capricious place Maggot must master its strange ways if he is to survive let alone win the heart and hand of the Lady Portia.Finlay s society of trolls are unlike any you ve ever read before, and his matriarchal medieval world, pitted as they are against an analog of Native American tribesmen, provides a rich setting for many poignant social and political insights.

    One thought on “The Prodigal Troll”

    1. In a world not of our own, the babe of a Baron is whisked away into the night by his nursemaid and a knight. As they flee, the castle they called home burns, over run with soldiers of the enemy. Nothing matters anymore but the safety of the child.They fail and succeed a the same time.Both adults meet their demise, however the baby is taken up by a female troll who has just lost her own infant. It is here Claye, known by trolls as Maggot, is suckled, then raised as a troll. Throughout his entire [...]

    2. This book deserves its comparisons to Kipling's Mowgli or Burroughs' Tarzan. The plot is familiar is that sense: baby lost in the wilderness, against nature is raised by animals. In this case, the boy is raised by trolls who act a lot like lowland gorillas. The trolls are fascinating, their society intriguing and really they are the whole are a lot more interesting than the humans, whose machinations are utterly confusing. The beginning with the intermarriage/named heirs/empress/eunuchs who are [...]

    3. So, I had to read this book no matter what simply because the title is so utterly fantastic. Turns out it was a good book too, so I lucked out.The story is essentially a Tarzan variation. A baby is abandoned at a very young age and adopted by a troll mother who has just lost her own baby. The kid is raised by trolls, who in this novel are primitive but not unintelligent, though certainly not as smart as humans. They're brutal, but it's an understandable brutality--a kind of natural state rough-a [...]

    4. The central character is a boy brought up by trolls, à la Tarzan or Mowgli, who then seeks his destiny among his own kind; he wanders into a human war between subsistence pastoralists and settled agriculturalists (Native Americans vs European feudal settlers seeming to be the paradigm) and eventually, in an ending that came rather abruptly though did at least fit with what we had seen before, chooses his own way.I was a bit dubious about the sexual politics of the book. The story is all about h [...]

    5. This felt a lot like The Sharing Knife series by Bujold. Great characters on a journey of discovery, great interactions with other characters and enough history thrown in in small chunks to make it interesting yet it didn't overwhelm. There may or may not be a sequel because this one had a really upbeat ending but a sequel is possible because our character is still learning about himself.

    6. Some really charming and moving passages, and I love the trolls, but between the creepy queercoding of the villain and the "noble white dude sees through society's bullshit—society, man, am I right?" I was left feeling pretty meh. I do really, really love the trolls, though.

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