Dawn O'Hara, the Girl Who Laughed by Edna Ferber, Fiction, Classics, Literary

Dawn O Hara the Girl Who Laughed by Edna Ferber Fiction Classics Literary There are a number of things that are pleasanter than being sick in a New York boarding house when one s nearest dearest is a married sister up in faraway Michigan Some one must have been very kind f

  • Title: Dawn O'Hara, the Girl Who Laughed by Edna Ferber, Fiction, Classics, Literary
  • Author: Edna Ferber
  • ISBN: 9780809595488
  • Page: 192
  • Format: Hardcover
  • There are a number of things that are pleasanter than being sick in a New York boarding house when one s nearest dearest is a married sister up in faraway Michigan Some one must have been very kind, for there were doctors, and a blue and white striped nurse, and bottles and things There was even a vase of perky carnations scarlet ones I discovered that they had a tricThere are a number of things that are pleasanter than being sick in a New York boarding house when one s nearest dearest is a married sister up in faraway Michigan Some one must have been very kind, for there were doctors, and a blue and white striped nurse, and bottles and things There was even a vase of perky carnations scarlet ones I discovered that they had a trick of nodding their heads, saucily The discovery did not appear to surprise me Howdy do said I aloud to the fattest and reddest carnation that overtopped all the rest How in the world did you get in here

    One thought on “Dawn O'Hara, the Girl Who Laughed by Edna Ferber, Fiction, Classics, Literary”

    1. This is the story of Dawn O'Hara, who finds the humor in things. She's charming and witty and stubborn and likable. It's her tale of struggle with romance, growing friendships and relationships, sacrifices and overcoming her past and embracing the future. It is a wonderful, easy read and I recommend it to those who enjoy a good story.

    2. Even though Edna Ferber is known for her stirring epics such as"Giant" and "Cimarron", for her first book she turned to the heady world of newspaper reporting, something that her work onthe Appleton Daily Crescent and the Milwaukee Journal preparedher for. I've never been a huge Ferber fan but this book (a 1911 editionthat has seen better days) is very readable. It is a lot of funand very nice to read, quite amazing that Edna's mother retrievedthe manuscript from a bin and sent it to the publish [...]

    3. Narrated by the sparky Dawn,a newspaper reporter in 1910s America, the novel opens with her ill in hospital. Her husband - the once charming Peter Orme - is in an insane asylum, and she has been struggling to pay for his keep.Dawn goes to recuperate with her married sister and observes that 'being an old maid was a great deal like death by drowning a really delightful sensation when you ceased struggling.' But she also meets the wonderful Dr von Gerhard, a nerve specialist sent to treat herBut D [...]

    4. What a wonderful, sweet and old fashioned slightly melodramatic romance and human interest story. I loved it. Being of both Irish and German ancestry made the characters and funny/tragic and intelligent Dawn O'Hara herself especially dear and wonderfully drawn characters to me. Very well written, short and sweet. I will read this again, I knowbut also want to read some of Edna Ferber's more well known novels soon. This being the first one of her stories I have read was a good introduction to her [...]

    5. Dawn is funny, independent, quirky and very good at her job as a young newspaper reporter in the early 1900's. I loved all the settings but most especially that of the very German Milwaukee. (Dawn is amazed to stumble upon a shop that has a sign "English spoken here"!) The descriptions of her boarding house, the meals and residents are charming.

    6. As frivolous and silly as it is, it's a wonderful, romantic story that may have been very popular in its day. It has feminist overtones that are very appealing to me. I think it was ahead of its time re: the heroine's profession, outlook and independence.

    7. An early work of Edna Ferber--written before Show Boat, Cimarron, So Big, and Giant. Apparently she went on to such a successful writing career she won FOUR Pulitzer Prizes. There is, horribly if you are a feminist as I try to be, the feeling reading this novel, however, which is a sweet romantic tale--that Ferber's life was touched by a deep loss in that she had no serious romantic relationship, apparently, and no children. Though a slim volume, the tale drags a bit in part because the plot--wh [...]

    8. الرواية من الادب الكلاسيكي الامريكي التي لا تحوي على حبكات قوية بين طياتها الا انها ستنساب الصفحات بين يديك بسرعة لرشاقتها وخفتها لذلك ستنتهي من قرائتها بسرعة .لم أجد شيء في الرواية وغير بول اوستر فإنني لا اهوى قراءة الأدب الأمريكي وقد جربت كثيراً وفشلت .الرواية مترجمة ومعر [...]

    9. Oh, please. This book was simply marvellous. So eloquent and delightful and full of the most charming characters, phrases, thoughts and occurrences. It certainly is no epic, but a quaint little darling hug in and of itself. So pure and wonderful, and so apt to have such a bittersweet ending. I didn't give it five stars because it didn't quite take my breath away, but it satisfied me marvellously, and kept me interested, and woke a spark of longing in me for typewriters, idyllic scenery, flowers [...]

    10. I ran across this early Ferber work when researching the transportation/auto editor of the Milwaukee Journal, W.W. "Brownie" Rowland. Thinly disguised, he appears as Dawn O'Hara's beloved boss in this 1911 novel.It's clearly a work of its time: "So Big," the other Ferber novel I've read, feels far more modern. However, if you have a personal connection with either Milwaukee or with the newspaper industry, this would be a must-read, especially since it's a free download off Project Gutenberg.

    11. Edna Ferber's debut novel was a delight to read. It reminded me of L.M Montegomery's writing but more for grown ups.

    12. Of the handful of written reviews of this book to date, all have been 4-5 stars except one three star review. I give this a two-star "it's okay" because I didn't enjoy it and wouldn't recommend it but some people might enjoy it. For me, the characters were too thin, too monochromatic, except perhaps Blackie who felt like a real person. The coffee shop was actually a great character too. Beyond that, I could hardly wait until it was over so I could move on to another book.

    13. Not a bad book. Depends on what you want to read. Good morals despite an unfortunate situation. But of course the unfortunate situation gets resolved in the ideal wayor pretty close to the ideal way. If I were writing a thesis on early feminist roles in literature this would be a good book to include because it's all about a lady newspaper columnist and her life experience as Cinderella while still fighting to be independent.

    14. Really good book. A young female newspaper reporter has a nervous breakdown. She is married and her husband us in an insane asylum. She heals and moves from New York to Millwauke. As she heals she and her doctor fall in love but she refuses to divorce her husband. It is a happy ending, but the tension remains in the story until the very last page. Edna Ferber did a great job!

    15. I have to say that I prefer Edna Ferber's 'Fanny Herself' and the Emma McChesney books to this one. Still a good story - and interesting, since Dawn O'Hara is a writer - but focuses a bit too much on character sketches and on Dawn O'Hara's recovery from 'nerves.'

    16. Ferber's earlier works are by far her best. This one was great. If you've ever loved an Edna Ferber, make sure you don't miss it!

    17. Just what I needed. A simple love story with wonderful characters and a remarkable sense of time and place. And best of all, it's the first Ferber I have read - so much now to look forward to!

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