Doctor Who: The Celestial Toymaker

Doctor Who The Celestial Toymaker Somewhere outside space and time there waits the Celestial Toymaker an enigmatic being who ensnares unwary travellers into his domain to play out his dark and deadly games Separated from the security

  • Title: Doctor Who: The Celestial Toymaker
  • Author: Gerry Davis Alison Bingeman
  • ISBN: 9780426202516
  • Page: 405
  • Format: Paperback
  • Somewhere outside space and time there waits the Celestial Toymaker, an enigmatic being who ensnares unwary travellers into his domain to play out his dark and deadly games.Separated from the security of the TARDIS, the Doctor is forced to play the complex trilogic game with the evil magician Meanwhile, Dodo and Steven must enter into a series of tests with, among others,Somewhere outside space and time there waits the Celestial Toymaker, an enigmatic being who ensnares unwary travellers into his domain to play out his dark and deadly games.Separated from the security of the TARDIS, the Doctor is forced to play the complex trilogic game with the evil magician Meanwhile, Dodo and Steven must enter into a series of tests with, among others, the schoolboy Cyril and the King and Queen of Hearts.If they lose, they are condemned to become the Toymaker s playthings for all eternity For in the malevolent wonderland that is the Celestial Toyroom, nothing is just for fun

    One thought on “Doctor Who: The Celestial Toymaker”

    1. The TV episode has such a great sense of mystery to it. I thought that reading the novelisation would add to that sense of wonder; instead, it actually makes the story seem much more mundane. And the narration sounds like it was written by a particularly bored robot.

    2. This is an absolutely ridiculous story. Right from the start where the Doctor vanishes inside the TARDIS to the eventual escape there is nothing of value in Celestial Toymaker.Spoiler alerts. ‎In a nutshut; the Celestial Toymaker‎, a being of immense power, brings the TARDIS into his 'universe'. To escape he makes the Doctor play a game of trilogic whilst Dodo and Stephen have to play a series of games themselves. They somehow win through, despite the Toymakers' servants/toys/pawns' attempts [...]

    3. nhwvejournal/825455ml[return][return]Fan lore seems to be that Alison Bingeman did most of the heavy lifting on this novel, which is competent enough but doesn't really sparkle. Indeed, the one point about the dialogue of the original which caught my interest - Dodo's exchange with Steven about whether the Toymaker's minions should be considered as real people or not - is weakened and watered down. Davis says proudly in his introduction that the novelisation allows the sets of the story to be po [...]

    4. There are good Doctor Who Stories, bad Doctor Who stories, and a lot that fall somewhere in the middle. In the bell curve of Doctor Who land, The Celestial Toymaker lands on the low side of the middle. It's not just that the plot is preposterous Doctor Who plots thrive on preposterosity, after all but that in a story about games and riddles, none of them are approached in what I consider a proper way they're presented as obstacles to bash through rather than conundrums to be solved.

    5. This was a really interesting read, pitting the Doctor, Steven, and Dodo against a sinister Toymaker and his insane puzzle rooms and collection of animated Dolls. Granted, since it's based off a television episode, the plot doesn't fully develop, so I hope the story of the Doctor and the Toymaker becomes expounded later in the series. Still in all, it was one of the better novelizations I've read thus far.

    6. First Doctor, Steven, Dodo. Novelisation of a season 3 story of which only the soundtrack and part 4 have been recovered. One of the poorer novelisations. Still engrossing, but the writing itself has frequent distracting problems. If you want to read or see every Doctor Who story you'll probably be reasonably happy with this novelisation; but if writing problems really bother you, you probably won't be.

    7. Not my favourite (mainly because it is fairly dull) but I think the episodes, should they ever be found, probably were too. The Doctor is missing for large parts of the book (as was Hartnell from the middle episodes if filming). It also revisited my wish for Dodo's quickened extinction. Have to admit I completely missed the racist overtones but Philip Sandifer makes a strong case on this in his Tardis Eruditorum blog.

    8. This is one of the two Doctor Who stories (along with the Daemons) that really creeped me out as a kid and it gives me the shivers even now. I can feel the tension and still see the chair folding up and leaving just a playing card. The book isn't as good as watching it on TV but it gets 4 stars as it evokes those memories .

    9. The first Doctor and company are trapped in a dimension of deadly children's games by the crafty Celestial Toymaker.Great villain, very similar to 'Q' from Star Trek. Shame they never brought him back.Fun story from back in Doctor Who's early days.

    10. The most disappointing of the late-era Target novels. This should have been the opportunity to expand on the strangeness of the TV version. Instead, it's so basic & threadbare a transcript, it makes a late 70s Terrance Dicks quickie-novelization look like "War and Peace" by comparison!

    11. Hey, I'm not too proud: I'll admit to reading Doctor Who books in my youth! This was my favorite. Evil gamester forces people to play with his deadly toys. With a story like that, how could you go wrong! Yes, it's right up there with Dostoevskiy and Gogol

    12. A total soufflé of a story. Fun to read, makes no sense and gone on a flash. I can't imagine it was that a great a TV story, it's really obvious that Hartnell was on holiday for most of it.

    13. These old Dr Who books are short and wonderfully campy. But this one, meh, the writing seemed to be lacking.

    14. Your typical "forced to play games by all-powerful being" story. Not a lot to it, but probably would have been fun to watch.

    15. This story was great. The story was twisted and scary. The Celestial Toymaker was sinister. And then you throw in creepy clowns. Gahh.

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