The Writer's Idea Workshop: How to Make Your Good Ideas Great

The Writer s Idea Workshop How to Make Your Good Ideas Great This title helps writers assess their ideas and grow them into finished pieces It includes than creative exercises and aims to show readers how to be creative complete projects rescue stalled proj

  • Title: The Writer's Idea Workshop: How to Make Your Good Ideas Great
  • Author: Jack Heffron
  • ISBN: 9781582972794
  • Page: 299
  • Format: Paperback
  • This title helps writers assess their ideas and grow them into finished pieces It includes than 300 creative exercises and aims to show readers how to be creative complete projects rescue stalled projects break through writer s block and use writing time productively.

    One thought on “The Writer's Idea Workshop: How to Make Your Good Ideas Great”

    1. I found this book at just the right point in my writing career. I've finished self-publishing a book, have several ideas I want to develop, but am out of the habit of writing. This only applies to my fiction. I don't ever seem to have trouble writing nonfiction. The Writer's Idea Workshop helps writers to work through stalled work, no matter where in a piece you are stalled. It has general ideas for writer's block, but it goes further than that, assisting writers in getting needed distance, inje [...]

    2. A book that any writer (especially novices) will refer to often--so much helpful information, and a wide variety of prompts that will lead a blocked or bored writer to regain some momentum on a stalled piece. One note of advice: Prompts abound; about 300 of them (perhaps, for ADD types like me, you may be tempted to try each one--I would have preferred just a few prompts were put up front in each chapter, with the remainder placed further back in the chapter or book). But all in all, if you can [...]

    3. A favorite book in my library. I've used this several times to "explode" my initial ideas or works-in-progress. Aside from getting you excited to write, it has all kinds of prompts and exercises to explore, develop, and revive whatever you're working on. When I feel a piece going stale, I pull this off my shelf.

    4. This was OK, I guess - it seems to be mostly concerned with how to develop ideas when you're completely stuck with them and don't know where to go next. Which I suppose is fair enough - if you're not stuck, why are you reading books about writing?

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