The Changeling (the First Book of The Saxon Tapestry)

The Changeling the First Book of The Saxon Tapestry Growing up in the fenlands of Mercia Hereward son of Earl Leofric is cursed with a birthmark thought by the common folk to be the work of elves or goblins A wild and defiant youth he is wrongly ba

  • Title: The Changeling (the First Book of The Saxon Tapestry)
  • Author: Sile Rice
  • ISBN: 2940011396878
  • Page: 179
  • Format: Nook
  • Growing up in the fenlands of Mercia, Hereward, son of Earl Leofric, is cursed with a birthmark thought by the common folk to be the work of elves or goblins A wild and defiant youth, he is wrongly banished by King Edward and shipwrecked off the Irish coast He is saved by the enchantress Muirgheal, and his new life with her tempts him to forsake England for good.MeanwhilGrowing up in the fenlands of Mercia, Hereward, son of Earl Leofric, is cursed with a birthmark thought by the common folk to be the work of elves or goblins A wild and defiant youth, he is wrongly banished by King Edward and shipwrecked off the Irish coast He is saved by the enchantress Muirgheal, and his new life with her tempts him to forsake England for good.Meanwhile, the weakness of the ailing and childless King lays the country open to the ravages of intrigue, ambition and conquest The ensuing power struggle pits brothers Harold and Tostig Godwinesson against each other, while both Vikings and Normans covet the land from without.Lyrical, tragic and earthy by turns, The Changeling, the first book of The Saxon Tapestry, conjures a magical portrait of life in Anglo Saxon England Sile Rice takes the fragments of medieval history, poetry and legend and transforms them into a historical fantasy of great beauty and power.

    One thought on “The Changeling (the First Book of The Saxon Tapestry)”

    1. No one could gainsay Sile Rice for this ambitious attempt. She had great material (the historical account of Harold’s rise to the monarchy of Anglo-Saxon Britain). She adopted a Chaucerian narrative which lent very much the feeling of the classical bard to the story. Her knowledge of the minutia of early medieval Britain is astounding.And yet I’d have to say overall the story failed, in my opinion. Why? There are several reasons. While the narrative voice is evocative of the period, there ar [...]

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