The Discovery of Insulin

The Discovery of Insulin When insulin was discovered in the early s even jaded professionals marveled at how it brought starved sometimes comatose diabetics back to life In this now classic study Michael Bliss unearths

  • Title: The Discovery of Insulin
  • Author: Michael Bliss
  • ISBN: 9780226058993
  • Page: 447
  • Format: Paperback
  • When insulin was discovered in the early 1920s, even jaded professionals marveled at how it brought starved, sometimes comatose diabetics back to life In this now classic study, Michael Bliss unearths a wealth of material, ranging from scientists unpublished memoirs to the confidential appraisals of insulin by members of the Nobel Committee He also resolves a longstWhen insulin was discovered in the early 1920s, even jaded professionals marveled at how it brought starved, sometimes comatose diabetics back to life In this now classic study, Michael Bliss unearths a wealth of material, ranging from scientists unpublished memoirs to the confidential appraisals of insulin by members of the Nobel Committee He also resolves a longstanding controversy dating to the awarding of the Nobel to F G Banting and J J R Macleod for their work on insulin because each insisted on sharing the credit with an additional associate, medical opinion was intensely divided over the allotment of credit for the discovery Bliss also offers a wealth of new detail on such subjects as the treatment of diabetes before insulin and the life and death struggle to manufacture it.Bliss s excellent account of the insulin story is a rare dissection of the anatomy of scientific discovery, and serves as a model of how rigorous historical method can correct the myths and legends sometimes perpetrated in the scientific literature.

    One thought on “The Discovery of Insulin”

    1. I have been born into a world that had insulin, and I thought that it had been decades since its discovery. I wouldn’t have known that this amazing medicine has only been discovered 100 years ago in 1921 until I read this book!The fact that people has been dying from diabetes only 100 years ago is shocking! A simple medication, that we doctors prescribe so effortlessly, has been a precious discovery and a hope to millions of diabetics only one century ago. A diagnosis of T1DM for a child at th [...]

    2. "The Discovery of Insulin" by Michael Bliss has to be considered the definitive word on the trials and tribulations on how insulin was discovered.I'd say, even this day, if you ask most folks who won the Nobel prize for the discovery of insulin, I believe that the most common answer still is Banting and Best, not Banting and Mccleod. Never mind even knowing who Collip was.The book edition I read was the 2007 updating of "The Discovery of Insulin" where Dr Bliss not only answers his first edition [...]

    3. Well-written and fascinating to read - Bliss manages to make the long account of lab work by Banting and Best into a page turner, a feat in and of itself, but his book also does a great job of showcasing the horror of pre-insulin diabetes, the magnitude of insulin's impact on treatment of the disease, and the sometimes sloppy process by which this discovery (and I'm sure many other great ones) was made.

    4. Well, I read the original article by Nicolae Paulescu and I can say with certainty that he is the discoverer of insulin. I do not know how many actually bothered to compare the articles of Paulescu and Banting's but I did it. Not to mention the date of publication of the two articles. Thus, it is a fully European discovery. I have spoken with many people (in the field of diabetology), and all of them consider that 1) Paulescu and 2) Collip should have been awarded the Nobel (or Paulescu alone). [...]

    5. Although I've said this before, I'll say it again. I read the original article by Nicolae Paulescu and I can say with certainty that he is the discoverer of insulin. I do not know how many actually bothered to compare the articles of Paulescu and Banting's but I did it. Not to mention the date of publication of the two articles. Thus, it is a fully European discovery. I have spoken with many people (in the field of diabetology), and all of them consider that 1) Paulescu and 2) Collip should hav [...]

    6. I should have written this review a while ago, but I didn't, and the review will suffer for it. I don't think my fascination with this book is completely related to my son's having diabetes. Maybe I'm fooling myself. It's simply amazing how the discovery of insulin came about; simply amazing that it came about at all, given how this story played out. It was the most exciting nonfiction book I've read in quite some time.

    7. I'm not sure if this is the same book I read years ago, about how insulin was discovered and first used to help diabetics. The book I read was very interesting and informative, walking you through the process of discovery and figuring out how to make it usable. It explains how they decided defined a "unit" of insulin, for example. Very readable.

    8. A fascinating true story describing the political maneuverings surrounding the search for a magic bullet to cure diabetes. Scientifically interesting in and of itself, but the infighting and intrigue add a dimension just as compelling as any work of fiction.

    9. My Mom was an infant when her Dad worked on the team that discovered Insulin. She was interviewed by the author of this book. I thought it was fascinating and a very good read.

    10. It is a must read for anyone who has a child with diabetes or is diabetic. It goes through the history of diabetes and also explains how insulin was discovered. Fascinating read!

    11. I read this book for a project at work in 2006 and totally forgot about it until I found a review online. Absolutely loved it.

    12. Considering that Bliss is neither an expert or a diabetic, I feel that he understood and conveyed the process, the implications, and the shortcomings of the discovery. And although perhaps a little less detail would have sufficed, I would still recommend this book.This book tells the fascinating and heart-wrenching story of the Nobel Prize winning discovery that is still responsible for keeping millions of people alive today. The author goes into much detail in telling the story, and at times it [...]

    13. highly recommended for all audiences. this book is easily accessible to people without a background in science (my last contact with the sciences was in high school). though bliss spares little detail about the methods and practices that went into the discovery of insulin, this is far from a dry history/science read. the way he writes it, it's less about the scientific processes than it is about the very human relationships between the scientists. mistakes were made; important decisions were mad [...]

    14. This book details the medical breakhrough of insulin's discovery in Toronto in 1921-22. The author profiles the primary researchers and lab heads, as well as early patients, physicians, and pharma partners who were involved in this miraculous medical development. The isolation and commercialization of insulin revolutionized the treatment of diabetes and saved and improved millions of lives.The author does a meticulous job of compiling lab records, diaries, patient histories, and even conversatio [...]

    15. At first glance, insulin discovery discovery is the perfect fairy tale story. A simple young country doctor who's scarred by the war is inspired in the middle of the night to set on his quest to discovering insulin. His simple background and average results certainly fit layman's picture of a brilliant transformation. We are all suckers for drama, writers most of all. That's where I compliment Michael Bliss's unbiased account of such -now I know, greatly paradoxical- story. Surprising and eye op [...]

    16. This book was recommended to me by a nutrition bookI was reading. The section I was reading was onthe effect of insulin resistance and the correspondinghealth problems that develops because of it. Thebook recommended reading the book "The Discovery Of Insulin" by Michael Bliss and I was able to borrow it from thelocal library.The book is a very interesting read on how insulin cameabout. You can think of the book as being made up of3 parts. The first part is a detailed exposition ofcountless expe [...]

    17. Since Diabetes runs in my family, I've heard a number of stories about how difficult the treatment used to be, for my grandmother in particular. It was through that lens that I absorbed all of the information about pre-insulin treatments, thinking of how lucky Grandma was to not be subjected to starvation diets or other torturous attempts to control the disease. What an awful existence for those patients. I was fascinated by the timeline associated with the discovery, how so many people around t [...]

    18. A masterfull book that reads almost like a novel. Researching and writing after the death of the protagonists and with the availability of their papers, historian Michael Bliss of the University of Toronto traces the story of the discovery of inulin, its purification, and administration to patients in the period from 1921 to 1923 by Frederick Banting, Charles Best, JJH Macleod and Bertram Collip. Theirs was a stormy partnership but when you finish reading you will understand the role each played [...]

    19. Quite Interesting, although a little bit tedious at times. But what can be expected of a book about the discovery of insulin. I do have to say I enjoyed learning where "units" came fromose poor rabbits and all of the dogs they went through, amazing to think that it took all that to get what we finally have today.

    20. It was a fun read and helped me learn more about medicine and the processes of scientific research a century ago. Glad we have insulin now because of the benefits it has given so many diabetics who I love and admire!

    21. I was very disappointed in this book. It was not what I expected at all. Many pages were devoted to discussion of the research. Without a modicum if experience in research, one can lose interest pretty quickly. Steps in extraction and manufacture were covered again the story was dry.

    22. Being dependent on insulin for life and all, I found this book pretty interesting. For me, it was a good mix of science and human interest. I walk away from the text with an increased gratitude for all that went in to bringing insulin (and diabetics) to life.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *