Grain

Grain Growing up in southern Manitoba Gander Stake learns to love the prairie not for its vistas but for its animal life and for the magic of the new machines that make it prosper More agonizingly howev

  • Title: Grain
  • Author: Robert J.C. Stead
  • ISBN: 9780771098963
  • Page: 340
  • Format: Paperback
  • Growing up in southern Manitoba, Gander Stake learns to love the prairie, not for its vistas, but for its animal life and for the magic of the new machines that make it prosper More agonizingly, however, he must learn how to love both his family and his grade school sweetheart.Set against the backdrop of World War I, this classic of prairie realism, first published in 192Growing up in southern Manitoba, Gander Stake learns to love the prairie, not for its vistas, but for its animal life and for the magic of the new machines that make it prosper More agonizingly, however, he must learn how to love both his family and his grade school sweetheart.Set against the backdrop of World War I, this classic of prairie realism, first published in 1926, ponders whether the battle for grain is not as crucial to a nation s self worth as the battle in Europe.

    One thought on “Grain”

    1. This simple coming-of-age novel tells us the story of "Gander", the son of a farmer. As Gander grows up on the farm, a life which he loves, he has to come to terms with the world outside the farm-especially during World War One and the period following it. The characters in this novel are ordinary people, living ordinary lives, but the author succeeds in showing us the deeper meaning behind their lives.

    2. The latest of the prairie settler novels of the mid-1920s, but with such a focus on new machinery and the far-away background noise of the First World War, it seems a tad more modern than Wild Geese or Settlers of the Marsh. Gander and his family live in a rural settlement, but generally an established one. However, hints of how recent the establishment really is comes in the form of the makeshift nature of the Stake household--Jackson Stake would rather buy new binders or tractors or even cars [...]

    3. It's an odd book. On one level, it's a fairly typical early 20th century prairie novel: bleak, agriculture-based, and earnest. But on another level, it's a passionate defense of the farmer in the face of wartime patriotism. The sibling subplot borders on Dickensian and even the main plot winds up being a little maudlin, but there's still something compelling about Stead's depiction of farm life--mostly because it seems so odd judged by current standards. To quote: "Gander let [the engine] ramble [...]

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