To the Stars

To the Stars SHANGHAIED INTO ETERNITYMen were always needed for the long passage And Captain Jocelyn knew that not even wealth and women were sufficient lure to fill his crew vacancies For there was a price that t

  • Title: To the Stars
  • Author: L. Ron Hubbard
  • ISBN: 9781592121762
  • Page: 143
  • Format: Audio CD
  • SHANGHAIED INTO ETERNITYMen were always needed for the long passage And Captain Jocelyn knew that not even wealth and women were sufficient lure to fill his crew vacancies For there was a price that those who entered the starship Hound would pay for their high adventure one that no sane man would accept.A prisoner in the timelessness of the swift passage to distantSHANGHAIED INTO ETERNITYMen were always needed for the long passage And Captain Jocelyn knew that not even wealth and women were sufficient lure to fill his crew vacancies For there was a price that those who entered the starship Hound would pay for their high adventure one that no sane man would accept.A prisoner in the timelessness of the swift passage to distant planet, Alan Corday lived for the day of his return to earth He conspired to seize the ship But the swashbuckling pirates of space had other plans plans that were as unchangeable as the laws of nature themselves And Corday learned the truth finally in the acrid fumes of a war of annihilation.

    One thought on “To the Stars”

    1. This has got to be one of the best science fictions books ever. It is a true classic. I first read it in 1971 when I found it in the library. I have read it numerous times since. I have often said that the true test of really well written fiction is being able to pick up a book you've already read, open it to any page and be right back into the story as if you'd been reading it all along. This book has passed that test over and over for me.If you've never read it you have a gaping whole in your [...]

    2. Cool scifi story about Alan Corday who was shanghaid aboard the "Hound of Heaven." He soon learns of the long passage and the cold equations by Einstein that predict the time away from Earth is multiplied many times when you are hitting at or near the speed of light. The adventurer has his tough times with the Captain Jocelyn, visits strange colonies, one taken over by aliens, and the Earth changes as the centuries roll on.Fascinating study of how a man changes and how the Earth may change as it [...]

    3. I was actually quite surprised by this book. Even though it was written after L. Ron began his descent into all things Scientology, I have to praise it for it's attempt to deal with the potentially harsh realities of near light speed travel. Apparently, it was this book that put the whole concept of time dilation into popular awareness. It isn't all roses though. The story seems to skip around a lot and there's a lot of what can only be called "pulp" tendencies to it. But, for attempting to writ [...]

    4. This is one of the grittier science fiction stories I have read. It deals with the extreme emotions of space travel and is based on the time dilation principle that as mass approaches the speed of light, time approaches zero. So those who are outbound to the stars in craft approaching the speed of light return to a much aged Earth relative to them. So their people are gone after returning from a voyage that perhaps only took them a few months. I really felt for the voyagers and could see why the [...]

    5. This book was nice, there's no privileged bullsh*t like you find in a lot of the sci fi stuff. i really liked how it broached the topic of time dilation in near-lightspeed travel. another good book similar to this is Poul Anderson's Tau Zero.

    6. I've avoided L Ron Hubbard for ages. Scientology I guess? I love old science fiction, so I don't get my avoidance of Hubbard.I have a friend. He gave me Heinlein years ago and got me hooked. Recently he tossed a handful of books at me and Return to Tomorrow was in the mix. Doug hasn't ever really steered me wrong befored then i was digging in my own shelf and found that I already owned the same copy. It seemed like I should probably just read the book. So I did. And I liked it a lot. I found thi [...]

    7. Little did I know that Hubbard, the founder of Scientology, used to be a sci-fi writer. On second thought, it makes much sense.

    8. Mi è piaciuto molto, specialmente perché si cerca di parlare di viaggi interstellari senza ricorrere all'iperspazio, e traendone le relative conseguenze.

    9. To the Stars was originally published in the February 1950 issue of Astounding Science Fiction magazine. It sold for twenty-five cents. That landmark issue also featured stories by A. E. van Vogt, Lawrence O’ Donnell, Poul Anderson, Roger Flint Young, Cleve Cartmill, and Katherine McLean. Hubbard’s story was the first of two parts and by far To the Stars was the issue’s highlight. The now famous letters-to-the-editor page – Brass Tacks – included a missive from a fan named Rudolph W. P [...]

    10. This is the first book by LRH that I have read and I had a passing interest since he is a church founder and I find philosophical and religious thought interesting. I was expecting some spillover of his religious thought in the book, but really found none.So then, as to the book itself. The main device is time dilation and the quandary is that when a short time passes for space travelers, a much longer time passes for people on a particular planet. As the people continue to travel back and forth [...]

    11. Along with another classic "The Forever War", To The Stars is dominated by the time dilation effects of near light speed travel. Leaving Earth on a 50 Light Year around trip means you barely age but on your return most people you know will probably be dead and huge changes in society, language and technology will pass you by.The hero of the story is tricked/shanghaied into joining a deep space merchant ship and his first return to Earth truly breaks his heart. Unlike many other sci-fi universes, [...]

    12. I have been rereading and listening to the audiobook today, May 5, 2013 I skimmed it years ago and set it aside. My appreciation for this tale went way up making better use of the glossary this time through.Harsh and gritty though it is, the craftsmanship of its telling is remarkable. Deep as space itself. I still have a few chapters and suspensefully re-await its conclusion.

    13. Hubbard is a condescending man. The intro exudes smugness. The idea of the book seems as if it would discredit religion with the idea that ideas fade, yet man will always need guidance. I don't know whether or not this was written before scientology was invented, but. all in all, I am not glad that I read it. That's the way I judge a book. Was it worth reading. This was not.

    14. The audiobook was slightly dramatized. At first I thought the story was treating the time difference thing a little heavy handedly, but then I realized that a) it is a pretty early scifi story and b) many space based scifi works practically ignore this effect. The ship's doctor is a humorously creepy psychologist. No big surprise coming from L Ron.

    15. Very meh writing combined with some conceptually interesting ideas about space travel. Author fails to make characters relateable enough to get his point about the tragic fate of potential space colonizers across.

    16. This story is gritty, harsh, brilliant and speculatively written off the Lorenz-Fitzgerald-Einstein equations. The audiobook is extraordinary and supplemented with a very beautiful piano track of Chick Corea.

    17. Excellent and quick book. I can see his influence now in other works as well; specifically Haldeman. Near light travel is such an interesting subject, and Hubbard covers it very well. Considering the age of the book, it's even more impressive.

    18. This book stands out in my memory as one of the greatest books on the realities of high-speed space travel, the human cost of time dilation and relativity.This should be required reading for any science fiction author who cares to invoke space or time travel in their books.

    19. Me gustó mucho. Es un libro que se lee muy rápido y que en ningún momento es aburrido. El final es inesperado, esto particularmente me gusta he hizo que el libro fuera ún mejor.

    20. Typical Sci-Fi from the 50's even if really written for a magazine in the 30's I liked the plot and the ending.

    21. Slightly depressing when one thinks about the overall picture, but at least the author reveals the purpose of the main characters.

    22. Classic science fiction; written in the 1950's, it transcends the period and is just as readable today as it was when it was written.

    23. It was an amazing book, my all-time top quote (from memory) "Space is deep, man is small, and time his relentless enemy."

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