Greener Than You Think

Greener Than You Think Ward Moore s classic novel Greener Than You Think posits a world with Bermuda grass running out of control choking out every other plant and destroying the food supply of animals and humanity alike Or

  • Title: Greener Than You Think
  • Author: Ward Moore
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 334
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Ward Moore s classic novel Greener Than You Think posits a world with Bermuda grass running out of control choking out every other plant and destroying the food supply of animals and humanity alike Originally published in 1947.

    One thought on “Greener Than You Think”

    1. Albert Weener, el cínico y mezquino narrador de la historia, es un vendedor puerta a puerta contratado por la doctora Francis para que venda su producto: el Metamorfoseador, que es capaz de mejorar sustancialmente el crecimiento de las gramíneas como medio para combatir el hambre en el mundo. Pero Albert, que no cree precisamente en el producto, decide probarlo en un césped marchito. Cuál no será su sorpresa cuando comprueba que realmente funciona. Pero surge un problema, y es que la hierba [...]

    2. This was a book that took me a while to read. It's not because is not interesting but because from the second half of the novel it drags a little and it's the same thing over and over again. Basiclly the plot is a apocalpytic fiction but not the usual types out there. It was not a war, a plague, alien influence, divine action or something like that. It all begins with grass.Indeed, grass. Bermuda Grass for that matter. We have here, a new experiment straight from the lab. It grows greener than g [...]

    3. Que pasaría si en la tierra brotarán brotes verdes sin control. Este es el planteamiento inicial que nos propone el señor Moore en su novela "Más verde de lo que creéis" una historia apocalíptica que no deja en muy buen lugar al ser humano. Contada de una forma un tanto pulp se convierte en una lectura entretenida y curiosa.Recomendada para todos aquellos nostálgicos.

    4. When I was a teenager I had a poster on my wall. It was a black and white picture of a beautiful Native American woman, and a text at the bottom half which said: "Only after the last tree has been cut down, only after the last river has been poisoned, only after the last fish has been caught, only then will you find that money cannot be eaten." This quote kept popping up in my head while reading this book.It is a story about one of the most redicilous little man (and I'm not talking about physic [...]

    5. Alguna vez escuche que ver la hierba creecer en un dia de verano era la cosa mas aburrida del mundo pero dentro de esta historia podemos ver como esto acaba siendo algo muy interesante y la vista de Ward Moore sobre la humanidad cuando enfrente la catastrofe definitiva (?).

    6. This book. It was fascinating. It was hilarious. I loved the writing, the characters, and the creativity of the unusual problem of grass taking over the world.It was originally published in 1947. The attitudes and prejudices, "'A woman scientist, ay? Funny things women'll do when they can't get a man.'" I nearly peed myself laughing. The editor and his lengthy insults including "addlepated," oh, my. The reporter who does magic tricks and speaks in different accents and of course Weener. Oh, Ween [...]

    7. anticapitalist, feminist satire better than it has any right to be. posthuman sublime rarely rendered better. highly, highly recommended.

    8. The edition I borrowed, from 1985, has an introduction by Isaac Asimov where he sort of laments that this is a lost classic, and wonders why this book isn't in greater circulation among traditional sci-fi fans. A modern reader would figure out why in the first few pages: This book is unbelievably sexist. It's only relevant to the plot once (when the scientist who invents the fertilizer that causes grass to take over the planet is dismissed as being unintelligent because she's female), but it com [...]

    9. Greener Than You Think (1961) comic Satire about a mutated form of grass which absorbs first Los Angeles and then the entire world while governments dither.

    10. When I read this book I couldn't help juxtaposing the story to Jonathan Christopher's "The Death of Grass", another apocalyptic SF novel in which the agent of mankind's destruction is grass. Only this time, instead of grass dying out, it is doing quite the opposite. It is taking over everything else and nothing man throws against it seems to stop it.Stylistically this is very different as well, being more of a satire than an adventure. The story being a narrative of the protagonist Albert Weener [...]

    11. Another addition to my post-apocalypse library.Originally published in 1947, this particular end-of-the-world scenario comes about due to a compound (the Metamorphosizer!) designed to increase the yield in food crops. The main character (I can't bring myself to call him a protagonisthe's not a good guy), Albert Weener, is a salesman and is contacted by the creator of the Metamorphosizer, a chemist named Josephine Francis.I should be used to the casual misogyny and racism of these mid-century boo [...]

    12. Greener Than You Think is a satire rather than an adventure story. One plant (a Bermuda grass treated with a special growth chemical) slowly spreads across California and beyond, swallowing cities and making vast tracks of land uninhabitable.One challenge with this book is that the narrator, Albert Weener, is unreliable. He sees himself as the hero whereas he is the villain and more of a monster than the weed. Plus the reader’s impression of events and characters is initially filtered through [...]

    13. I would LOVE to own this book. The style is so vibrant, the characters are so unique and memorable all to the backdrop of a very depressing situation. One little spray of an untested chemical on one lawn in Los Angeles ends up creating a worldwide catastrophe. Its worth a read for the main character's boss alone! Oh my, what combination of words come out of this guy's mouth -- its amazing. This novel comes HIGHLY recommended!

    14. A rather long-winded account of the earth conquered by a mutant strain of Bermuda grass. The first person narrator is a "born salesman" who not only sets the thing in motion, but stays at the center of events through chance and luck. Moore creates memorable characters, satirizing mysogyny, newspaper men, military men put out to pasture, and the British servant classes. Perhaps it goes on too long, but at times it is very funny, and the narrator's cluelessness can be both amusing and irritating.

    15. Un libro bastante desconocido, con un estilo que no termina de convencer, con algunas ideas un tanto desfasadas pero con un fondo bastante interesante y una caracterización de la sociedad francamente buena. El libro comienza con un acontecimiento bastante inofensivo al parecer: la inoculación a la hierba de un césped de un producto que promete mejorar sustancialmente su crecimiento y su respuesta ante diversos agentes. Lo que no estaba previsto era el crecimiento incontrolado de esta planta y [...]

    16. what a weird and unexpected bookrst published in 1947, it has (through its satirical bent) a remarkably modern outlook: environmentalist, feminist, anti-racist, etc etc. and a vicious antagonist, the worst antagonist humanity has ever faced: genetically modified, voracious blind Bermuda grassy california gardener who has ever fought against this vicious predator knows that the Bermuda always wins. i once laid thick black plastic sheeting over a huge swath of Bermuda in the summertime (90+ degree [...]

    17. Another addition to my post-apocalypse library.Originally published in 1947, this particular end-of-the-world scenario comes about due to a compound (the Metamorphosizer!) designed to increase the yield in food crops. The main character (I can't bring myself to call him a protagonisthe's not a good guy), Albert Weener, is a salesman and is contacted by the creator of the Metamorphosizer, a chemist named Josephine Francis.I should be used to the casual misogyny and racism of these mid-century boo [...]

    18. I read a lot of books that could be classed as apocalyptic fiction, and I've never seen anything like this before. I'm not sure it's 100% unique, but it's certainly unusual. It's not an amazing book, but it's worth a look if you're a fan of the genre.The book is written as if it's the personal account of events as described by a single character, Albert Weener. Weener starts the story as a salesman who makes a deal with an eccentric scientist to sell her new formula that will help farmers grow c [...]

    19. This was an end of the world satire that thought itself entirely too charming. There WERE parts that were enjoyable - though each of the characters are a caricature, there are enough of them that by the end of the novel you get a sense of breadth and "epicness" to the end of the world. The main character is an amoral misogynist who thinks himself quite plucky - he's also the narrator in a close first person viewpoint that is sometimes pretty unreliable. The grass taking over the world is the mai [...]

    20. This book has a fun premise, but it drags on for way too long. By the time the grass reaches Europe, I was eager for the book to be over.Albert Weener is the narrator and main character you'll love to hate. He is extremely sexist, especially in the way he treats Josephine Francis, the inventor of the Metamorphizer that mutates the grass. He never takes his share of the blame seriously, instead seeing only money-making opportunities. It is his ineptitude and greed that causes the Bermuda grass to [...]

    21. I read this book for the first time as a teenager, in a Spanish translation. It was part of an SF collection, and it became one of my favourites in the lot. I have now re-read it in the original English, and can confirm my initial judgement."Greener than you think" , originally written in the 40s, is an anticapitalist, environmntalist, feminist satire, an end of civilization story, which is at times hilarious, but remains dark throughout and gets sad and terryfying as the slow death of civilized [...]

    22. Thanks to the power of science, enlarged and unstoppable Bermuda grass overtakes the world as humanity bickers over the means to stop it. The novel is a dark social satire that comments on everything from the print media to Capitalism to humanity's ability to find other things to focus on instead of the real crisis---the Soviet Union even invades America at one point after the US is half covered by grass, but ends up suffering humiliating setbacks on behalf of the grass. Our protagonist is every [...]

    23. As a satire, it felt a little weak. As apocalyptic fiction it felt a little weak.The author wanted us to think that the narrator’s every opinion was deluded, self interested and prejudice, and yet, the narrator became the most wealthy and powerful man in the world…!I found the ending hugely depressing, and I have read a *lot* of post-apocalyptic fiction. Even though part of the satire was to imply that the scientist Miss F. missed the point and spend so long researching things that the world [...]

    24. Forget about triffids. Bermuda grass is the deadliest killer plant in literature.Written in the late fories, Greener Than You Think is one of the best end-of-the-world tales around. This is mainly due to the fact that it doesn't take itself too seriously. Usually this is a pretty gloomy genre (Cormac McCarthy's The Road has you rushing for the prozac the second you set it down) that just doesn't mine the humor potential in the mass extinction of humanity.A salesman applies a chemical to a Los An [...]

    25. Entirely too Vonnegut for me. Depressing, political, moralizing, and full to the brim with characters that not only failed to inspire the least bit of empathy, but actively annoyed and/or repulsed -- and this includes the narrator, a small-minded, self-congratulatory idiot I loathed within the first few pages. As if to add insult to injury, the author threw in weird conceits, like omitting apostrophes from contractions and hyphens from compound words, and including a character who constantly swi [...]

    26. I started this book very enthusiastically but quit reading it a little over halfway through. It had ceased to be amusing and was becoming a bit of a slog. The initial momentum seemed to wain and I couldn't bring myself to read the different characters interpretations of events - the flowery poetry of the general's son, the pompous writings of the editor of the Intelligencer. I found myself unwilling to force myself forward and finally gave up on the book.It also suffered from a loss of focus. On [...]

    27. Published in 1947, Greener Than You Think is still an engaging, funny read. The protagonist and narrator, Albert Weiner, is one of science fiction's most delightful and dastardly villains, and he is all the more so because he seems genuinely blind to his own villainy. The scenario - scientifically-altered bermuda grass run amok - is comical, but as the plot develops apocalyptically, it is also weird and disturbing. This book provides a bunch of laughs and some commentary on modern American prior [...]

    28. Albert Weener is a self-absorbed, self-deluding door-to-door salesman when this apocalyptic tale begins. He sets off a chain of events that threaten all of humanity by the time it ends. Throughout it, he is in total denial about his culpability in bringing civilization to its end, as well as the immorality of his behavior. It's a lengthy tale, and a bit tedious at times. Nevertheless, it should be required reading for every member of Congress, the Obama administration, the media, and every execu [...]

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