What Is Amazing

What Is Amazing Inspired by a voracious curiosity about humans and other subjects the poems in Heather Christle s What Is Amazing describe and invent worlds in an attempt to understand through participation The book

  • Title: What Is Amazing
  • Author: Heather Christle
  • ISBN: 9780819572776
  • Page: 199
  • Format: None
  • Inspired by a voracious curiosity about humans and other subjects, the poems in Heather Christle s What Is Amazing describe and invent worlds in an attempt to understand through participation The book draws upon the wisdom of foolishness and the logic of glee, while simultaneously exploring the suffering inherent to embodied consciousness Speakers play out moments of braInspired by a voracious curiosity about humans and other subjects, the poems in Heather Christle s What Is Amazing describe and invent worlds in an attempt to understand through participation The book draws upon the wisdom of foolishness and the logic of glee, while simultaneously exploring the suffering inherent to embodied consciousness Speakers play out moments of bravado and fear, love and mortality, disappointment and desire They socialize incorrigibly with lakes, lovers, fire, and readers, reasoning their way to unreasonable conclusions These poems try to understand how it is that we come to recognize and differentiate objects and beings, how wholly each is attached to its name, and which space reveals them What Is Amazing delights in fully inhabiting its varied forms and voices, singing worlds that often coincide with our own.

    One thought on “What Is Amazing”

    1. I didn't enjoy this collection as much as Christle's previous two. There are bright lines that leap off the page, but not as many poems that shimmer in their entirety. * * * * *to finish at last the portrait of the cloudand to look up and discovernow the subject has moved on

    2. Bummed it's all over. Loads of lines end up to be punch-lines. The moving poems are unexpected. There are twists. Wacky then wise. Favorite chunk: "And I hope I do not drown/as I have seen happen/to hundreds of spiders/b/c I love to swim/and to drown would/wreck swimming/for a long time."

    3. I READ THIS COLLECTION TWO TIMES THROUGH. Oh, caps lock was on. The excitement of the capitals fits though. But the book is actually quiet. Even with its exclamation points and slyness. I admire how she is so purposefully playing with what a poem is on the page. There are no periods in the first section. Periods appear in the last poem in the second section. The third has more standarized puncutation and pretty damn perfect couplets. The key is that it all feels on purpose. I WILL KNOW YOU BY YO [...]

    4. Even though the title of this collection isn't really a question the answer, if it were one, would be "this book".There is some jaw dropping language, and brain plumbing metaphors that defy description; I think stunning is too ordinary a word for what's going on here. Heather Christle's poetry is moving and affecting and, once you realize just how she is presenting her unique view of the world, really quite enlightening.

    5. This book was my introduction to poetry, and I learned to see poetry through a different light thanks to my English teacher Mr. Henn.

    6. SELF-PORTRAIT WITH FIREThey asked me if I was on fire and I said No no no nono no no I did not want to make trouble I was lying I wason fire on my legs and on my hands I was ashamed I triedto hide my legs by kneeling I set the grass on fireIF YOU GO INTO THE WOODS YOU WILL FIND IT HAS A TECHNOLOGYThis tree has a small LED displayIt is glowing and it can show you wordsand it can show you pictures and it can meltfrom one choice to another and you are looking at itand it wants you to share the mess [...]

    7. the liner notes on this book say that this book 'draws upon the wisdom of foolishness and the logic of glee' - i don't know what that means, and i don't really like the sound of it, but i do really like Heather Christle and her poems. What i like about them is that they seem to begin in confusion and then make sense of themselves. You kind of willingly follow them blindly and them stumble on some unexpected piece of light. In this collection she uses the words Cloud and Hole a lot, and she is in [...]

    8. I'm actually a little hesitant to rate this book at all - because it's not that I thought this was bad poetry, I just definitely don't think it's my kind of poetry. I found part i incredibly difficult to get through, the style not particularly enjoyable - although I loved many of the titles, they seemed like poems in and of themselves, without any need for the following blocks of text. Parts ii and iii seemed to have more to say to me (although less exciting titles), and while there were a coupl [...]

    9. Despite having read two of her books, I haven't quite jumped on the Heather Christie bandwagon. As others have said, there are some brilliant lines and inspiring questions and ideas in many of these poems, but as whole pieces, they mostly feel incomplete, to me, tip-of-the-iceberg thoughts that don't follow through. I'd read a few lines that were really thought-provoking, but then the poem jumped to something else and I was left wanting a bit more from the first idea. Would love to have seen som [...]

    10. "the spider" (34) - "the spider he is confusedb/c i am not killing himonly moving him outdoorswhen i die i do not wantto feel confusedno i would rather feel claritylike i am a pooland death a chlorine tableti want it to feelnot like i am dyingbut am being transferredto the outsideand i hope i do not drownas i have seen happento hundreds of spidersb/c i love to swimand to drown wouldwreck swimmingfor a long timebut death is like none of thisi know that death is a towerstanding in the middle of th [...]

    11. Once upon a time I would have read this cover to cover in one sitting, and am glad I didn't. But Part 1 / The Seaside! is a good single-sitting read. The second and third parts felt like they had a more New Yorker cadence to them then other work, I've read, but I can roll with that and liked what was going on. "Angry Fawn" is just great. Many poems in here are just great. Make sure you see her at a reading -- that's great, too. Grab the book. Enjoy.

    12. Favorite sections of the book:Part I - is like listening to your sweet, but ADHD, "crazy" aunt who looks at everything around her with a rhizomatic eye and tells you all about what she sees and feels, but somehow her hyper-attentive, ocular disbursal gels together with a tensive power that unifies splintering with reconstitutionPart III - reminds me of some of Rae Armantrout's more recent work: a shifting and imagistic techtonics which also moves the reader with its lyricism

    13. not her best book, but there were some really good poems in here. also I think it's like instructive or indicative of poetry right now. I think it's a good book and you should read it, but you should read it after you read her other two and stuff. this review is not as good as the book. it is not a very good review.

    14. Like her two previous collections, this one sinks in slowly but once she gets fully into your mental space there's no removing her. Gets better and greater depths revealed (like any great art) with repeated visits.

    15. I mildly enjoyed these poems. There were some moving lines, but overall, I believe that the author was missing the direction of truth.

    16. There were many amazing lines and images here, but what really stays with me is the form: the line breaks, the the capital lettersl of it. I'm intrigued.

    17. I loved her last book--unfortunately I ordered this on my kindle and it difficult to read that way. But there were some really great moments.

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