The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792--1794

The Terror The Shadow of the Guillotine France For the audience that made a major bestseller of Simon Schama s Citizens A Chronicle of the French Revolution comes this exhaustively researched character driven chronicle of revolutionary terror it

  • Title: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792--1794
  • Author: Graeme Fife
  • ISBN: 9780312352240
  • Page: 312
  • Format: Hardcover
  • For the audience that made a major bestseller of Simon Schama s Citizens A Chronicle of the French Revolution comes this exhaustively researched, character driven chronicle of revolutionary terror, its victims, and the young men energetic, idealistic, and sincere who turned the French Republic into a slaughterhouse 1792 found the newborn Republic threateneFor the audience that made a major bestseller of Simon Schama s Citizens A Chronicle of the French Revolution comes this exhaustively researched, character driven chronicle of revolutionary terror, its victims, and the young men energetic, idealistic, and sincere who turned the French Republic into a slaughterhouse 1792 found the newborn Republic threatened from all sides the British blockaded the coasts, Continental armies poured over the frontiers, and the provinces verged on open revolt Paranoia simmering in the capital, the Revolution slipped under control of a powerful clique and its fanatical political organization, the Jacobin Club For two years, this faction, obsessed with patriotism and purity self appointed to define both inflicted on their countrymen a reign of terror unsurpassed until Stalin s Russia It was the time dominated by Maximilien Robespierre, Georges Danton, Jean Paul Marat and Louis Antoine Saint Just called The Angel of Death , when Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette met their ends, when any hint of dissent was ruthlessly quashed by the State It was the time of the guillotine, neighborhood informants, and mob justice This extraordinary, bloodthirsty period comes vividly to life in Graeme Fife s new book Drawing on contemporary police files, eyewitness accounts, directives from the sinister Committee for Public Safety, and heart wrenching last letters from prisoners awaiting execution, the author brilliantly re creates the psychotic atmosphere of that time.

    One thought on “The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792--1794”

    1. While reading Graeme Fife’s The Terror, I became very curious about who would publish such an abysmally written history of the Terror. I tried to find information about Portrait Books, an imprint of Piatkus, but the imprint seems to have been wiped out of existence. The only official mention I could find was from an interview with the publisher of Piatkus in which she stated that “[o]ur Portrait imprint is more about entertainment than information and appeals to history and music buffs” (b [...]

    2. This was an enormously difficult read, in part because there's a cast of hundreds--or at least dozens and dozens--and in part because the author assumes a lot of background knowledge that, alas, this reader did not have, and also because his writing is just difficult to understand. Is this being said tongue in cheek, is this what the subject said or what someone else said about the subject, etc, etc? He kept inserting the last names of people in the middle of a paragraph, without reference to wh [...]

    3. This book might be an informative source of the turmoil that was the French Revolution but it's written so poorly that I can't make head nor tails of the sentences. The use of commas is rampant and they are splattered here and there until sentences are incomprehensible. Such a pity.

    4. Putting the modern world in perspective of the French Revolution (that surprisingly followed the USA successful revolution by a dozen or so years!)

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