The Rise of Universities

The Rise of Universities The origin and nature of the earliest universities are the subjects of this famous and witty set of lectures by the man whom eminent scholars have called without exaggeration the soul of the renascenc

  • Title: The Rise of Universities
  • Author: Charles Homer Haskins
  • ISBN: 9780801490156
  • Page: 125
  • Format: Paperback
  • The origin and nature of the earliest universities are the subjects of this famous and witty set of lectures by the man whom eminent scholars have called without exaggeration the soul of the renascence of medieval studies in the United States Great as the differences are between the earliest universities and those of today, the fact remains, says Professor HaskinsThe origin and nature of the earliest universities are the subjects of this famous and witty set of lectures by the man whom eminent scholars have called without exaggeration the soul of the renascence of medieval studies in the United States Great as the differences are between the earliest universities and those of today, the fact remains, says Professor Haskins, the the university of the twentieth century is the lineal descendant of medieval Paris and Bologna In demonstrating this fact, he brings to life the institutions, instruction, professors, and students of the Middle Ages.

    One thought on “The Rise of Universities”

    1. Excellent quick overview of a question almost no one, applying to or attending an American university, ever stops to ask themselves: where do these institutions and all their forms and customs come from in the first place? Higher education as we think of it was not an invention of Greece or Rome, but of medieval Europe. Three lectures-now-chapters -- and earlier education was almost entirely lecture-based -- cover "The Earliest Universities", "The Medieval Professor", and "The Medieval Student". [...]

    2. A brief but detailed book, on the original universities. In medieval times.First covering the institutions themselves, then the professors, then the students.The universities frequently pick arbitrary times as the founding, because in reality they kinda grew. the books and the subjects taught. The laws students forced on professors, such requiring permission for absence and fining any that didn't draw five students to a lecture as if he had been absent. The first colleges were simply ways to hou [...]

    3. I read this book for a class on perspectives on U.S. higher education for my master's degree program. This book was developed from three lectures given by Haskins in the 1920s on the origins of universities in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. One chapter focuses on the universities themselves, one on early professors, and one on students. The text does read more like an oral presentation than a comprehensive text, and thus is short on in-depth details and citations. While not incredibly com [...]

    4. Livrinho fantástico, esse. Nas minhas listas desde que o vi indicado pelo Otto Maria Carpeaux, no Volume I de sua História da Literatura Ocidental, eu vinha adiando sua leitura até que a Danúbio o publicou no Brasil e eu o recebi como brinde por ter participado de uma de suas campanhas de crowdfunding (não que eu não leia o original inglês, mas sabem como é, quando o livro cai, impresso, no teu colo, as coisas mudam de figura).Muito do que está aqui eu já sabia, seja pelo próprio Carp [...]

    5. This is a series of lectures converted into a book. Reader be forewarned. The continuity is of the spoken word, not of the written one. Also the author presupposes certain knowledge. It was an interesting look into the rise of the modern collegiate system.

    6. Although written almost a century ago (1923), this is an enjoyable (not dry) overview of the early universities and their founding. Although Pederson is perhaps more comprehensive, Haskins' work is an excellent introduction to the topic.

    7. I bought this for a quarter this morning. The premise was rather promising. Apparently the text was culled from a rasher of lectures delivered in the 1920s. There is a depressing dearth of example or citation. I would've pitched it were it not for the links to Waddell's Wandering Scholars.

    8. Three lectures constitute this explanation of how American universities can find their roots in Medieval European universities. It was written in the 1920s and is still considered a seminal work on the topic. It contained some interesting information about how universities evolved.

    9. Excellent short book comprising of three lectures on medieval universities, covering the institutional origins, instructional model and student life. Centred primarily on Bologna and Paris, though other European universities make appearances from time to time, it is a thematic study rather than institutional history. The writing shows its age though - somewhat long winded and rhetorical as was common in the 1920s when these lectures were delivered - but that may be part of the charm of this book [...]

    10. Haskins asks the question "what are the roots of the modern university?" and finds its roots in the Middle Ages (he was a medievalist after all). He then traces the humble beginnings of these early institutions with their itinerant professors and their rowdy students (one unfortunate quarrel ended when a student entered a lecture with a cutlass and killed his colleague--good times). If I'm not mistaken this is one of the very early studies on the Medieval University.

    11. Important little book. In three acts. Traces the origin of an institution, finds (without realising it) the origin of Europe as a concept or as an idea, the precursor of modernism, democracy and human rights - and other fanciful ideas.

    12. This short book, given as a series of Lectures at Brown in 1923, is filled with flash, dash and panache. They don't make academics like Haskins today and more's the pity.

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