Cuba--Going Back

Cuba Going Back Imagine being unable to return to your homeland for thirty six years What would you do if you finally got a chance to go back In after travel restrictions between the United States and Cuba were

  • Title: Cuba--Going Back
  • Author: Tony Mendoza
  • ISBN: 9780292752337
  • Page: 346
  • Format: Paperback
  • Imagine being unable to return to your homeland for thirty six years What would you do if you finally got a chance to go back In 1996, after travel restrictions between the United States and Cuba were relaxed, Cuban exile Tony Mendoza answered that question Taking his cameras, notebooks, and an unquenchable curiosity, he returned for his first visit to Cuba since summerImagine being unable to return to your homeland for thirty six years What would you do if you finally got a chance to go back In 1996, after travel restrictions between the United States and Cuba were relaxed, Cuban exile Tony Mendoza answered that question Taking his cameras, notebooks, and an unquenchable curiosity, he returned for his first visit to Cuba since summer of 1960, when he emigrated with his family at age eighteen In this book he presents over eighty evocative photographs accompanied by a beautifully written text that mingles the voices of many Cubans with his own to offer a compelling portrait of a resilient people awaiting the inevitable passing of the socialist system that has failed them.His photographs and interviews bear striking witness to the hardships and inequalities that exist in this workers paradise, where the daily struggle to make ends meet on an average income of eight dollars a month has created a longing for change even in formerly ardent revolutionaries At the same time, Cuba Going Back is an eloquent record of a personal journey back in time and memory that will resonate with viewers and readers both within and beyond the Cuban American community It belongs on the shelves of anyone who values excellent photography and well crafted prose.

    One thought on “Cuba--Going Back”

    1. An excellent travel/biography book interspersed with b&w pictures of many Havana and other island locations in Cuba.The author had to flee Cuba with his family when he was 18, just months after the take over by dictator-narcissist Castro. In '96 he visits Cuba again briefly and takes with him his camera. This is not a touristic approach to Cuba. This is the personal and nostalgic -not angry- brief comeback of a Cuban exile. And man, does he succeed in making us feel like exiles too!Themes vi [...]

    2. I’ve never understood the vehement hatred that many Miamian Cubans feel for Castro, Cuba, and even their own family members who remain in Cuba. Mendoza’s memoir helped me to comprehend this perspective better. Like many upper class Cubans, he left the island with his parents at age 18 in 1960. Fidel Castro had come into power the year before, and after dissolving American interests in Cuba had turned his attention to creating a socialist state. This meant confiscation of the material goods o [...]

    3. Tony Mendoza's short and intriguing narrative about returning to Cuba, his homeland, after 37 years is eye-opening. A child of wealth and great privilege - he grew up with a coterie of servants, a summer beach home, and went to the finest schools in the U.S. - he returned in 1997 to find the country probably much like he imagined: lost in time and place, a crumbled monument to socialism and the fanaticism of a dictator whose stranglehold on the country left it decades behind the rest of the worl [...]

    4. Before I start I was a student in photography when Mendoza taught there but never took one of his classes (to be honest I wasn't nearly good enough to take his advanced classes. My goal was for slightly artistic photojournalism so I chose to minor but didn't even finish that before Ohio State tore down the walls of the photo faculty and rolled them into the art school So my actual contact was listening to a guest lecture that was clever, honest and funny I have been a fan ever since.)For a littl [...]

    5. Journalist Mendoza returned to his native Cuba after around thirty years of life in the United States to find his homeland ravaged by the effects of Castro's egocentric socialism. The book is full of wonderful black-and-white photographs he took on the trip. These photos are the real reason for reading the book. The prose is interesting, if not a bit dull, but the perspective of an immigrant is refreshing.

    6. Tony Mendoza has created an eloquent record of his personal journey back to Cuba. He has 80 photographs and interviews of over 200 Cubans from his time going back home. The book is so beautifully written that you can not put it down until the last word is read. The interviews and pictures were taken in 1996, and his book took two years to write. It's a sad commentary on a failed system that causes much pain and suffering.

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