Sour Land

Sour Land Life is hard for the three Stone children The death of their mother has left them bereft and grieving Their father tries hard to make things better but he is busy trying to keep their farm going Even

  • Title: Sour Land
  • Author: William H. Armstrong
  • ISBN: 9780064400749
  • Page: 230
  • Format: Paperback
  • Life is hard for the three Stone children The death of their mother has left them bereft and grieving Their father tries hard to make things better, but he is busy trying to keep their farm going Even the land around them seems to have betrayed them It is so barren that it is known as sour land.Then Moses Waters comes to teach at the black school at Cedar Corners MoseLife is hard for the three Stone children The death of their mother has left them bereft and grieving Their father tries hard to make things better, but he is busy trying to keep their farm going Even the land around them seems to have betrayed them It is so barren that it is known as sour land.Then Moses Waters comes to teach at the black school at Cedar Corners Moses can hear things no one else can, like the sound of the grass and the earth humming together More than anyone else, he seems to have a special understanding of the Stone family Only Moses can help them out of their grief.But a sour land grows sour people There are some folks in town who don t approve of the friendship between the white Stone family and the new black teacher And it looks like they will go to dangerous lengths to stop it.

    One thought on “Sour Land”

    1. This book is not a sequel to Sounder, but does make one reference to Sounder in the middle of the book. Because of the introduction to Sounder by the author, and because of the ending of this book, I think it is based on the author's real life. And like real life, there isn't always a happy ending. This would be a good book for reader's who like books by Mildred Taylor, such as Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry.

    2. There is no indication that this is sequel to William H. Armstrong's Newbery award winning novel Sounder until about midway through. Moses is asked if he ever had a dog and he answers that he did, once and the dog's name was Sounder. That book is the reason I can never read animal books, so I immediately braced for something similar to happen in this one. Like so many stories written about post-slavery relations, the stereotype of the sage older black man teaching rural white kids history lesson [...]

    3. Moses Waters grew into a gentle man with a keen insight into life. He has a reverence for books and learning. Ansom Stone, a farmer, hires Moses to work on his farm. Ansom's children, David, Jonathan, and Ruth fall in love with Moses who shares with them stories and a love of nature. When school starts in the fall, Moses starts teaching at the Negro school in Cedar Corners. He stays on with the Stones to help with chores and the children's lessons in the evenings. Moses and the Stones enjoy a wo [...]

    4. Life is hard for the three Stone children. The death of their mother has left them bereft and grieving. Their father tries hard to make things better, but he is busy trying to keep their farm going. Even the land around them seems to have betrayed them: It is so barren that it is known as sour land.Then Moses Waters comes to teach at the black school at Cedar Corners. Moses can hear things no one else can, like the sound of the grass and the earth humming together. More than anyone else, he seem [...]

    5. This book was about a white family who befriends a black man and take him in as a member of their family pretty much. Because of this the children go through a couple trials at school and the father has to deal with several issues including in the end the black man being shoot and then framed as a drunk. I really loved this book. Even though it did deal with a very controversial issue, I thought that the book presented in such a beautiful way.

    6. A sequel to the book Sounder that won a Newberry award in the 70's. It contains the same stark look at conditions for black people in the south, but this time told mostly through the story of an accepting white family and how the old man improves their lives. The story is warmer than the first one, but still portrays the inequity of the times, particularly with the ending.

    7. It seems that the injustices of ignorant, mean people prevail in a cursed world, but the main character in this story rises above the pettiness and brutality of wicked people to teach us love instead of hate, peace instead of fear and order instead of chaos.

    8. The book started a little slow, although it picked up and turned into an excellent story. I recommend this book for everyone ages 11+.

    9. Lyrical writing but way ham-handed with the moral lesson. Saw how that one was going to end by the conclusion of the first chapter.

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