Moral Essays: Volume II (De Consolatione ad Marciam. De Vita Beata. De Otio. De Tranquillitate Animi. De Brevitate Vitae. De Consolatione ad Polybium. De Consolatione ad Helviam)

Moral Essays Volume II De Consolatione ad Marciam De Vita Beata De Otio De Tranquillitate Animi De Brevitate Vitae De Consolatione ad Polybium De Consolatione ad Helviam Lucius Annaeus Seneca born at Corduba Cordova c BCE of a prominent wealthy family spent an ailing childhood youth at Rome in an aunt s care He became famous in rhetoric philosophy money making

  • Title: Moral Essays: Volume II (De Consolatione ad Marciam. De Vita Beata. De Otio. De Tranquillitate Animi. De Brevitate Vitae. De Consolatione ad Polybium. De Consolatione ad Helviam)
  • Author: Seneca John W. Basore
  • ISBN: 9780674992801
  • Page: 276
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Lucius Annaeus Seneca, born at Corduba Cordova c.4 BCE, of a prominent wealthy family, spent an ailing childhood youth at Rome in an aunt s care He became famous in rhetoric, philosophy, money making imperial service After some disgrace during Claudius reign he became tutor then, in 54, advising minister to Nero, some of whose worst misdeeds heLucius Annaeus Seneca, born at Corduba Cordova c.4 BCE, of a prominent wealthy family, spent an ailing childhood youth at Rome in an aunt s care He became famous in rhetoric, philosophy, money making imperial service After some disgrace during Claudius reign he became tutor then, in 54, advising minister to Nero, some of whose worst misdeeds he didn t prevent Involved innocently in a conspiracy, he killed himself by order in 65 Wealthy, he preached indifference to wealth evader of pain death, he preached scorn of both there were other contrasts between practice principle We have his philosophical or moral essays 10 traditionally called Dialogues on providence, steadfastness, the happy life, anger, leisure, tranquility, the brevity of life, gift giving, forgiveness treatises on natural phenomena Also extant are 124 epistles, in which he writes in a relaxed style about moral ethical questions, relating them to personal experiences a skit on the official deification of Claudius, Apocolocyntosis Loeb 15 nine rhetorical tragedies on ancient Greek themes Many epistles all speeches are lost.

    One thought on “Moral Essays: Volume II (De Consolatione ad Marciam. De Vita Beata. De Otio. De Tranquillitate Animi. De Brevitate Vitae. De Consolatione ad Polybium. De Consolatione ad Helviam)”

    1. The Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca lived from 4 BCE to 65 CE when he died by his own hand at the order of the Emperor Nero, whose teacher he had been but who suspected him of participating in an assassination plot. Seneca’s writings are among our best sources of what Stoic philosophy propounded, and although over the years there have been scholars who have been skeptical that Seneca himself followed these principles very closely, the writings and their teachings are consistent with Stoic princ [...]

    2. You can't help but quietly think to yourself that Seneca loves the sound of his own voice / (words), but whilst continuing to read, you begin to understand why this is justified. The way he builds up and hammers his point home is pretty extraordinary, and you find yourself thinking more deeply than you ever thought possible over over his philosophising.His reasoning is like a breath of fresh air in this over-individualistic, Machiavellian and desire-led country that we live in.If, like me, you e [...]

    3. Seneca is a brilliant writer and sometimes his writings are amazing in their insights.I really found the incident of the philospher Stilbo very thought provoking and I thought long and deeply over it.Stilbo reply to the Tyrant who had destroyed his country,dishonoured his daughters and seized all his possesions when the tyrant asked him if he had lost anythingHe replied he had lost "nothing" for all he needed was there with him. his virtue and good character were still with him which no man coul [...]

    4. "Quod ad ipsam Fortunam pertinet, etiam si nunc agi apud te causa eius non potest — omnia enim illa, quae nobis dedit, ob hoc ipsum, quod aliquid eripuit, invisa sunt —, tunc tamen erit agenda, cum primum aequiorem te illi iudicem dies fecerit; tunc enim poteris in gratiam cum illa redire. Nam multa providit, quibus hanc emendaret iniuriam, multa etiamnunc dabit, quibus redimat; denique ipsum hoc, quod abstulit, ipsa dederat tibi. Noli ergo contra te ingenio uti tuo, noli adesse dolori tuo. [...]

    5. Excellent. If you know something about Rome, it's even better. If you don't, it'll still teach you and arm you with much wisdom for facing today, tomorrow, And the rest of your life.

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