The Gebusi: Lives Transformed in a Rainforest World

The Gebusi Lives Transformed in a Rainforest World Written specifically for students this ethnography provides an engaging real life account of the transition from a traditional to a modern culture It uses vibrant poignant stories and examples to c

  • Title: The Gebusi: Lives Transformed in a Rainforest World
  • Author: Bruce M. Knauft
  • ISBN: 9780078034923
  • Page: 152
  • Format: Paperback
  • Written specifically for students, this ethnography provides an engaging, real life account of the transition from a traditional to a modern culture It uses vibrant, poignant stories and examples to connect developments among Gebusi to topics widely discussed in anthropology courses, including comparative aspect of subsistence, kinship, politics, religion, gender, ethniciWritten specifically for students, this ethnography provides an engaging, real life account of the transition from a traditional to a modern culture It uses vibrant, poignant stories and examples to connect developments among Gebusi to topics widely discussed in anthropology courses, including comparative aspect of subsistence, kinship, politics, religion, gender, ethnicity, nationalism, and applied anthropology When first studied by Bruce Knauft, the Gebusi of Papua New Guinea conducted ritual dances and spirit seances, practiced alternative sexual customs, and endured a high rate of violence By the late 1990s, Gebusi had converted to Christianity and actively pursued market activity, schooling, government programs, sports leagues, and disco music By 2008, however, their public services and cash economy had deteriorated, and Gebusi relied increasingly, once again, on indigenous customs and practices Some aspects of change, however, remained enduring More recently, problems of economic hardship have persisted as has the resilience of Gebusi culture This third edition of the The Gebusi has been updated and streamlined throughout and has new material as well as Broader Connections sections following each chapter.

    One thought on “The Gebusi: Lives Transformed in a Rainforest World”

    1. I am not the intended audience for this book; I read it looking for something set in Papau New Guinea from which I would learn a bit about the country and its people, while the book seems intended for assignment in undergraduate anthropology classes as a supplementary textbook. It did fulfill my goal of learning about the lives of the Gebusi, a small tribe living in the rainforest of Papau New Guinea’s huge Western Province. On the other hand, it’s a shame that academic texts aren’t writte [...]

    2. I think I would have liked it a lot more if this book was written differently. It was so fascinating to learn about these people, and you feel attached to them. However, the author jumps around a lot and sometimes I found it hard to follow. He would start one side story, then another without finishing the first, go back to the first finish it, and then finish the second. However, that was just me, and I probably would recommend it to any Anthropology lover.

    3. The book was your basic ethnographic account of a fledgling anthropologist making a name for himself. Where this voyage differed was in the fact that in this fourth edition, Bruce Knauft offers remixed versions of the Gebusi by repeating his travels to Papua New Guinea over the course of about thirty years. By documenting the unadulterated Gebusi before modernization and globalization seeped in, Knauft was able to help preserve the culture of a dying rainforest civilization so that they do not v [...]

    4. This is my first ethnographic reading and it was very enjoyable. Bruce Knauft goes with his wife to study the Gebusi people of Papua New Guinea in 1980. They study their customs and beliefs while living amongst the people. It is interesting to see their dynamic and how they conduct themselves. They worship spirits, hunter and gather (which allows for much leisure time), believe sorcery is the reason behind adult death. A big part of their culture is their homicide rate. In the Gebusi world there [...]

    5. This story is a great informational text by Bruce Knauft. In the Gebusi, there is a group of anthropologists traveling to Papua New Guinea, searching for an indigenous group of people that we had no information about. After living with these people for 3 years, the team learns about the practices of this group of people as well as certain parts of their language and culture. I love the pictures of this book because they are real photos taken by the author himself. Every photo has so much meaning [...]

    6. This ethnography blew me away. I actually read the updated copy when the anthropologist went back two more times to visit these people and chronicle their changes. Never before have I read about an entire culture so far removed from Western society, then inundated with it, then restored to (nearly) their original state. These people were wild, became sanctified, and returned to a peaceful form of tradition and Christianity.They also proved what it takes to cure a society of violence. A must read [...]

    7. I loved reading this book. It was truly fascinating to read and learn about a culture that was so isolated and had this pristine quality about it. And then seeing how "modernization" affected them and really hurt their culture and they entered a plight not unlike many others we see around the world. What I love most though, was their ability to adapt to the ever changing situations.

    8. Absolutely loved this book. Great ethnography and shows a fantastic change of culture in the past and in today's world. Second edition is far better than the first with the addition of today's changes within the Gebusi. Fantastic read.

    9. an interesting book on the lives of the Gebusi and how they changed between the author's visit. But it read too much like a textbook (yes, i know it is a textbook) for it to be very enjoyable for pleasure reading.

    10. one of the better ethnographies I've read. The author is very receptive to and interactive with the people he's working with, and he is more focused on telling the stories of actual people that he came to know as friends than flexing his anthropological chops.

    11. Eye-opening. I loved the personal narrative interwoven with his fieldwork observations. I wish that he had incorporated his wife's work with the women of the group a lot more than he did.

    12. "Who can deny the world of change in cultures? Or the richness of humanity that persists despite all that would suppress it?"

    13. This was a very interesting book that was filled with a lot of good information. I used this for a report for my sociology class and everything was well written, easy to find about the Gebusi Tribe.

    14. This was a fascinating read. Bruce describes everything so well that you really feel that you get to know the Gebusi. The ending is very touching. I admit I cried.

    15. This ethnography helped me learn how to rid myself of my ethnocentric thinking, and also taught me how to embrace the many differences in how people live all around the world.

    16. I read this book for my anthropology class at school. It is really pretty fascinating if you enjoy learning about other cultures.

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