The Sell Your Novel Tool Kit

The Sell Your Novel Tool Kit ENHANCE YOUR CHANCES OF GETTING YOUR NOVEL PUBLISHED WITH THIS ONE OF A KIND GUIDE Writers often spend years perfecting their first novel then hit a dead end when it comes to getting it published Lear

  • Title: The Sell Your Novel Tool Kit
  • Author: Elizabeth Lyon
  • ISBN: 9780399528286
  • Page: 391
  • Format: Paperback
  • ENHANCE YOUR CHANCES OF GETTING YOUR NOVEL PUBLISHED WITH THIS ONE OF A KIND GUIDE Writers often spend years perfecting their first novel then hit a dead end when it comes to getting it published Learning to market your novel will make it stand out from the thousands of other books clamoring for the attention of an ever shrinking number of publishers In this book, ElizabENHANCE YOUR CHANCES OF GETTING YOUR NOVEL PUBLISHED WITH THIS ONE OF A KIND GUIDE Writers often spend years perfecting their first novel then hit a dead end when it comes to getting it published Learning to market your novel will make it stand out from the thousands of other books clamoring for the attention of an ever shrinking number of publishers In this book, Elizabeth Lyon offers the wisdom of than twenty years of experience as an author, book editor, writing instructor, and marketing consultant Step by step, she details what editors want, what questions to ask them, and how to develop a marketing strategy You will learn How to categorize your novel, and the sixteen ways of describing it Nine ways of selling your novel Descriptions of the jobs of literary agent, editor, and writer Examples of actual story synopses, and successful query letters in all the genres How to prepare sample chapters Thirty questions a writer needs to ask a prospective agent

    One thought on “The Sell Your Novel Tool Kit”

    1. Selling your novel to an agent or a publisher is not the fun part of being an author. It’s about strategy. It’s about condensing your entire book into a page. It’s about summarizing the highlights. It’s about categorizing your book into a genre so that an editor or agent will “get it” without having to read it. All in all, it can feel degrading. I know that my book is a living thing all its own. A multi-faceted meme, a catalyst that interacts with each mind in a different way (some w [...]

    2. A good primer to seeking a home for your novels. Lots of examples of queries and synopses, with notes on what makes them effective, or not. Also, tribulation and success stories at the end of each chapter and a good section on what questions you should ask prospective agents.

    3. As usual, I won't use a whole lot of time reviewing a non-fiction book. However, I did find this book very helpful and specific, and the layout is pretty good for reference purposes. I only found a couple faults with Lyon's book. The first was that it's outdated by a few years. (It was published in 1997, when the Internet was still pretty young and emailing queries still seemed a bit too casual.) The second is, like a lot of people who teach and write on publishing, she favors her own methods ab [...]

    4. I remember reading this while I was spending an afternoon in the library looking up writing books. I finished it in one sitting and appreciated how Lyon gives a coherent summary of how to market one's work once it's completed, including a ton of helpful examples on how to write good queries for publishers/agents. However, it does show its age and doesn't take into consideration the digital platform for marketing. I wish I could find a book that included some of the information that was in this b [...]

    5. One of the better books I've read on this topic. I do wish the author would update the book, though. This one still talks about sending paper manuscripts and SASE envelopes! Still, I like how the book gives inside information and a marketing strategy. Many writing books do not get this specific. I learned a thing or two. This book was recommended by Robert Dugoni for his writers' retreat that I will be attending in October.

    6. So you've written, rewritten, and rewritten. You've workshopped your manuscript at a conference. You've joined a writer's group and gotten feedback. You've let your manuscript cool off and rewritten it again. Now you think you're ready to sell it. This book is a crash course on getting an agent and more. Don't start querying until you've read i

    7. I've spent months reading this book off and on. It's very, very informative and has many query letter examples. I would advise taking some of the content with a grain of salt though, since it is from the 1990s, and the industry has changed quite a bit since then.

    8. It wasn't as useful as I'd hoped. Some of the charts are good, but keep in mind that the book is dated. I don't recommend spending your money on purchasing it--if you're interested, borrow it from your local library. There are more helpful resources on the internet for query letters and synopses.

    9. Clear and concise advice on what you need to do to get your book sold. The query letter and synopsis examples are incredibly helpful.

    10. In serious need of updating (w/r/t how to research and submit to agents), but a good overview to start from. Proceed directly to Query Shark and QueryTracker thereafter.

    11. This was good. I'll definitely want to re-read it when I have a finished manuscript ready to shove out of the nest.

    12. Well I ordered this to help me with the novel I am 'trying' to write. I have enjoyed it so far, and gives the information on the publishing world in simple terms.

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