The Darker Face of the Earth

The Darker Face of the Earth The Darker Face of the Earth the first full length play by Pulitzer Prize winner Rita Dove is an Oedipal tragedy of interracial love set on a plantation in pre Civil War South Carolina The play has

  • Title: The Darker Face of the Earth
  • Author: Rita Dove
  • ISBN: 9781885266941
  • Page: 130
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Darker Face of the Earth, the first full length play by Pulitzer Prize winner Rita Dove, is an Oedipal tragedy of interracial love set on a plantation in pre Civil War South Carolina The play has been read on Broadway, and has had full stage productions at The Kennedy Center, The National Theatre in London, The Oregon Shakespeare Festival, among others Rita Dove is tThe Darker Face of the Earth, the first full length play by Pulitzer Prize winner Rita Dove, is an Oedipal tragedy of interracial love set on a plantation in pre Civil War South Carolina The play has been read on Broadway, and has had full stage productions at The Kennedy Center, The National Theatre in London, The Oregon Shakespeare Festival, among others Rita Dove is the author of numerous books of poetry, including the 1987 Pulitzer Prize winning collection, Thomas and Beulah She has served as the Poet Laureate of the United States, and has been awarded both Guggenheim and NEA fellowships, as well as been the recipient of many of our nation s most prestigious literary awards Rita Dove lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.

    One thought on “The Darker Face of the Earth”

    1. This play written by former U.S. Poet Laureate, Rita Dove, is superbly written and should be read by anyone interested in pursuing excellence in playwriting.

    2. I read this play only for several day (not to mention that I was forced by deadline to do so). Honestly, I never read Oedipus mythology. But this play kinda lead my way to make myself read that Oedipus thing later on.If I had a chance to pick a role that defines myself, then it'll be Hector who lives in a swamp far from the plantation. This play was about that forbidden love between different races from generation to generation, how colored people were being slave, and whites were being so mean [...]

    3. This story cleverly uses the story of Oedipus, but beyond that, I wonder if the story is that believable. I have heard terrible stories of abuse to slaves, but not from the women of the house. Not that it couldn't have happened, but I find it unrealistic that Amalia's husband would leave Amalia to care for the plantation, apparently so upset at her infidelity. And he also goes crazy and looks at the stars and moon phases all the time. Which is weird. But overall I thought the fact it was in the [...]

    4. A very interesting retelling of Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrranus, set in antebellum South Carolina. Worth reading just to see how malleable and interesting Greek tragedy can be when put into a more modern setting. I felt that many of the characters wound up lacking satisfying resolution, but the main thrust of the play was very engaging and worth a viewing or reading.

    5. This was a really enjoyable read once you got a little way into the play. I found it fairly predictable but I imagine it would probably be performed very well on stage. I found the characters hard to separate and kept getting them muddled up but this soon disappeared and you were left with very detailed characters that you could imagine thoroughly.

    6. As a reworking of the Oedipus tale, this play has as many twists and turns as the original. One of the most interesting, in my humble opinion, is the theme of fate - just as in Sophocles' play, the characters in DFotE are constrained by an overarching power (in this case, society and the institution of slavery), unable to escape the coming tragedy.

    7. A great play. Definitely read Oedipus Rex before or while reading this play, since Darker Face of the Earth is basically an Oedipus complex.

    8. Interesting retelling of Oedipus. Even if you know the host text and can predict the events somewhat, it is still entertaining and a new spin on the Oedipus most people are familiar with.

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