The Billion Shop

The Billion Shop The Billion Shop was a shop near my office that sold paper money and other artefacts for ethnic Chinese people to burn as offerings to their dead It no longer exists Jixiang Traditional Foot Massage n

  • Title: The Billion Shop
  • Author: Stephanie Ye
  • ISBN: 9789810715496
  • Page: 391
  • Format: Chapbook
  • The Billion Shop was a shop near my office that sold paper money and other artefacts for ethnic Chinese people to burn as offerings to their dead It no longer exists Jixiang Traditional Foot Massage now stands in its place I m not one to lament change, and trust in Adam Smith s invisible hand that the good people of Toa Payoh would rather please souls But I m also sentThe Billion Shop was a shop near my office that sold paper money and other artefacts for ethnic Chinese people to burn as offerings to their dead It no longer exists Jixiang Traditional Foot Massage now stands in its place I m not one to lament change, and trust in Adam Smith s invisible hand that the good people of Toa Payoh would rather please souls But I m also sentimental about places gone, loves lost, ideals overturned or, often, outgrown Consider these stories, then, as my own paper offerings to my dead.

    One thought on “The Billion Shop”

    1. You know the feeling of discovering a great new band, one that's still small enough to be playing local clubs and seedy bars, but you can just tell from the quality of their music and the awesomeness of their sound that they're going to make it big someday, and that you were a superfan before they broke through? Reading this chapbook is like the literary equivalent of that experience.I've been a fan of Stephanie Ye's writing for a few years now, mostly catching her short fiction in Quarterly Lit [...]

    2. This book is a perfect gem of beautiful ordinariness, where the descriptions so effortlessly describe a world all at once foreign and familiar. After visiting Singapore to attend a conference early this year, I became fascinated by the short and curious history of this tiny city-state. The short lines on the back of the book described the changes the author -- a 30-year-old (at the time of publishing) Singaporean -- had experienced in her life, and these stories a paper offering to the places an [...]

    3. Deftly crafted, these four interlinked stories are a little window into middle class Singaporean JC and post JC life, its outward facing character and the tenuous connections between people when they leave school. Quite beautiful.

    4. There's so much feeling in less than 100 pages. I love it when I found out that the stories are actually interlinked, and I only realized it when I came across familiar names in the next stories. The last part brought me to fully round up a story of childhood friends, and how far the relationships have stretch after they're no longer bound by the force of school universe. Bringing (or ordering, in a case) one chapbook home made me feel like a kid carrying her unopened gift box home. I knew that [...]

    5. It was amazing how well they linked all the 4 short stories together, concluding with one of the most important elements in life- friendship.The local setting would definitely set in nostalgia for readers like us as well, "billion shops" found among shophouses. It is a pity that our small country's rapid development have been eroding many of these areas, and these stories serve well to hold memories of this place which would otherwise have been forgotten.

    6. Ye reminds me of a Singaporean Alice Munro somehow. The stories grow in strength: The Billion Store and Astoria are especially wonderful (even if they're not as sublime as Seascrapers, that really is a standout short). I'm not sure how much I cared for the continuing retinue of characters though -- that felt like writerly scaffolding that could have been done without with. It's a very lovely anthology though, and I can't wait to read more from Ye.

    7. I bought this book during my vacation in Singapore because I wanted to read something local. What I got, though, was a glimpse of how internationally involved Singapore is. The stories span countries and cultures. I think my favorite of the four short stories is "The Billion Shop" but I like how all of the four were connected to each other.

    8. A great, but too slim, collection of stories. Displacement, physical and spiritual, is a theme that runs through all three of the stories here, and Ye's skill with language is remarkable. Definitely a writer to watch out for.

    9. of moments missed, due to the choices we made. life is beautiful in its mysterious ways, and Ye brilliantly illustrates this through her wonderful interlinked stories. the best stories give you insight on the human condition, and this doesn't fail on that aspect.

    10. Loved the way Stephanie, through reducing the most familiar local things in writing, made them into something much more than the ordinary things we have grown to neglect around us. I loved this book so much that I hate how it ended too soon.

    11. Five stars for Steph -- but seriously, these stories take me back to the textures of Singaporean JC (junior college) life in the '90s.

    12. Lovely book with sweet prose that tells neat little stories about people who desire for something more. Enjoyed it very much.

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