Pendulum: How Past Generations Shape Our Present and Predict Our Future

Pendulum How Past Generations Shape Our Present and Predict Our Future Politics manners humor sexuality wealth even our definitions of success are periodically renegotiated based on the new values society chooses to use as a lens to judge what is acceptable Are thes

  • Title: Pendulum: How Past Generations Shape Our Present and Predict Our Future
  • Author: Roy H. Williams Michael R. Drew
  • ISBN: 9781452659848
  • Page: 435
  • Format: Audio CD
  • Politics, manners, humor, sexuality, wealth, even our definitions of success are periodically renegotiated based on the new values society chooses to use as a lens to judge what is acceptable.Are these new values randomly chosen or is there a pattern Pendulum chronicles the stuttering history of western society that endless back and forth swing between one excess and anoPolitics, manners, humor, sexuality, wealth, even our definitions of success are periodically renegotiated based on the new values society chooses to use as a lens to judge what is acceptable.Are these new values randomly chosen or is there a pattern Pendulum chronicles the stuttering history of western society that endless back and forth swing between one excess and another, always reminded of what we left behind.There is a pattern and it is forty years 2003 was a fulcrum year, as was 1963, its opposite.Pendulum explains where we have been as a society, how we got here, and where we are headed If you would benefit from a peek into the future, you would do well to listen to this book.

    One thought on “Pendulum: How Past Generations Shape Our Present and Predict Our Future”

    1. I would say this may be the second best book I have read this year. I can't stop thinking about it. Everything makes more sense now.

    2. The way this book breaks down trends and movements into predictable cycles is amazing and really helps the reader understand why things are the way they are. I loved this book and subsequently explored the product as well and was very happy with both. No one else is talking about these cycles, and more importantly, how we can use the understanding of them to grow our business, rethink our marketing strategy and build our brand around true customer service. A winner of a book, highly recommended! [...]

    3. A shallow and superficial piece of pop sociology; Herbert Spencer writ small and cheap. He says at the beginning that he realized the talk and power point presentation he's been giving on his idea of 40 year cycles was too US-centric and last-150-years-centric, so he's going to go big and find proof of his idea from world history and 3000 years. He then proceeds to talk almost entirely about the US in the past 100 years, spending maybe a total of 7 pages of the whole book on the rest of the worl [...]

    4. As a matter of disclosure I received a copy of this book to review as a core reviewer for the 12 Books Group. The expectation is that I will participate in the discussion on and post my review on , , my blog and other pages.I am always leery of a book where the number of endorsement pages vastly outnumbers the number of note pages for the chapters and the index for the book. Unfortunately, this book by Roy H. Williams and Michael R. Drew lived down to my expectations.The premise of the book is [...]

    5. This book makes some pretty far-reaching and bold statements about mankind and societies in the present, past, and future. Because of this, it's easy to look at Pendulum's conclusions with a skeptical, even cynical eye. But as the book's argument unfolds, it becomes clear that the book's conclusions aren't arrived at hastily. Rather, they are a result of years of study, re-study, and testing. As with any book that is grounded in a "soft-science" like sociology, there will be many who ridicule Pe [...]

    6. Roy Williams proposes that the collective psyche of societies oscillate along a single axis between collective commitment and individualism. This is not an original thought - see Anthony Burgess, The Wanting Seed. But Williams takes this further, claiming that the cycle has a precise period, 40 years between extremes. In the preface, Williams promises to skeptically challenge his own hypothesis. But the only thing rigorous about this small book is its adherence to the anecdotal method.

    7. Very thought-provoking.As a novice observer of history I find the historical examples in relation to the "Me" and "We" cycles to be spot on. Well researched and presented in an compelling manner makes for a quick and enjoyable read.

    8. Makes you want to analyze history more and see parallel movements to predict the direction of our society. Paradigm shifting.

    9. Very poorly researched. As an amateur music historian I can point out several mistakes off the top of my head -- as well as several exclusions. For example: 1938 - Artie Shaw's "Begin the Beguine" is the #1 song. That's correct, but then the book goes on to quote lyrics from the song -- yet Shaw's version has no lyrics. In fact earlier versions (there is a few from 1935 and onward) had been recorded with lyrics but weren't hits; thus quoting the lyrics to illustrate a point iswelleless.Same thin [...]

    10. Williams and Drew make the following argument: history goes in 40-year cycles, each with a 20-year upswing and a 20-year downswing contained in it. First, there’s a “Me” cycle, then a “We” cycle. Me cycles demand freedom of expression, applaud personal liberty, believe in the individual, look for a better life, dream big dreams, need to be number one, likes decisiveness, leadership, and heroes. We cycles demand conformity, applaud personal responsibility, believe in the herd, want a be [...]

    11. Pendulum: How Past Generations Shape Our Present and Predict Our Future is a poorly written "historical" book. Within this work, Williams and Drew attempt to make a constructive argument on generational trends, but it is more of a haphazard collection of charts, quotes and lists. Having little structure, the authors historical points are weak, limited and, in my opinion, lacking clarity. This book reinvents how generational trends influence a culture and is not a new to most historians. I would [...]

    12. This is a fascinating analysis of over 3000 years of cultural trends, and Williams does a great job showing how the Western culture oscillates every 80 years between extremes of being "me" focused (a "zenith" in the early 80's) and "we" focused (as seen in the McCarthy years, and we are coming into that era as we speak). I recommend you read this book if nothing else than to be sensitive to the trends in society that can lead to the extremes (with the hope of minimizing them) as well as being aw [...]

    13. With the world being the way it is, and seemingly getting stranger by the day, this book has helped me understand why. The authors have done a great job at explaining the different cycles that society goes through and what we should expect during those cycles. I no longer fear the future as much as I used to because of it. In addition, knowing what to expect has lead me think of things to do to help stop (or even soften) the blows that will come.

    14. What a fantastic book! I heard this book recommended in a YouTube video so I decide to buy it. What a fantastic read. It is thought provoking and cause you to be more aware of the culture in which we are currently residing. Overall fantastic!

    15. This book sets forth to defend a staggeringly enormous idea of such stunning simplicity that it gives the reader considerable pause An 80 year cycle that explains the course of events through all of human history? "Big if true" indeed. And though one can't help but wonder if an equally compelling book could be written with an exactly opposite perspective, flipping the ends of the cycle and cherry-picking events to support it, the message lingers in your mind, egging you, daring you to doubt it's [...]

    16. I do not recommend this book and could barely even skim this book. My suspension of disbelief was severely stretched when the author claims that the secular cycles last for 40 years. However, I'm interested in theories that can explain or spot stages of the cycles. He goes on to ramble incoherently and repeat himself over and over about the duality of the secular cycle: an upswing and downswing. He categorizes them for no real purpose and with no real evidence.The author mentions T.S. Eliot as p [...]

    17. Very poorly researched. As an amateur music historian I can point out several mistakes off the top of my head -- as well as several exclusions. For example: 1938 - Artie Shaw's "Begin the Beguine" is the #1 song. That's correct, but then the book goes on to quote lyrics from the song, yet Shaw's #1 version had no lyrics. In fact earlier versions (there is a few from 1935 and onward) had been recorded with lyrics but weren't hits; thus quoting the lyrics to illustrate a point iswelleless.Same thi [...]

    18. 2.5 stars. I find this concept interesting, I just didn't really like the explanation of it in this book. I found some things confusing. I still don't have a clear image of a ME or a WE generation. Some of the things written in the tables throughout seemed contradictory, and I didn't clearly see what the authors were getting at in their descriptions of historical figures and events. I feel I should read The Fourth Turning (as suggested in the book) and then revisit Pendulum. Perhaps I will under [...]

    19. I think this book leaves out many things to be considered. a generation can not show how significant it is only through pop culture. by doing so you disclude what influenced the generations in the first place, the society in which they were raised, the experiences that the generation befor had on influenceing the next gen. Expectations. Also it seems this research was done as a way to prove thier theory, which is not the way to do research. meaning I feel the authors picked and chooseed what wou [...]

    20. The idea behind their theory is worth the thought. And Pendulum makes an interesting book.However it doesn't prove or convince of anything specific.It is written as an as-is fact/truth; many points and the 2 pendulum extremes and its respective ideologies sound reasonable, just not necessarily written on stone, as they make it look.It certainly gives many historical references which make you analyze and compare different regions and generations, while also trying to match it to the proposed theo [...]

    21. Very interesting, and the next 20 year or so will likely be scary times. History repeats itself, so knowing these 40 and 80 year trends is wise in order to try to prevent making embarrassing mistakes that have already been made.

    22. This book covers the cycles of society. The swing of the pendulum from a we cycle to a me cycle and back and forth it goes. Each cycle has good and bad but we always take things too far If you are interested in marketing and history and even politics this book is worth checking out

    23. Perspective-tweakingThis book helped me understand the world, people (particularly in groups), war, trends and culture more than other book I've read.

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