A Tourist in the Arab Spring

A Tourist in the Arab Spring In the aftermath of the Arab Spring war reporters rushed to publish accounts of the uprising Tom Chesshyre took a different approach he jumped on a plane and became the first to return to the region

  • Title: A Tourist in the Arab Spring
  • Author: Tom Chesshyre
  • ISBN: 9781841624754
  • Page: 132
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, war reporters rushed to publish accounts of the uprising Tom Chesshyre took a different approach he jumped on a plane and became the first to return to the region as a tourist The result is the fascinating, street level tale of a journey through lands fresh from revolution Tunisia, Libya and Egypt Chesshyre heads for tourist siteIn the aftermath of the Arab Spring, war reporters rushed to publish accounts of the uprising Tom Chesshyre took a different approach he jumped on a plane and became the first to return to the region as a tourist The result is the fascinating, street level tale of a journey through lands fresh from revolution Tunisia, Libya and Egypt Chesshyre heads for tourist sites that few have seen in recent years, as well as new attractions like Gaddafi s bombed out bunker in Tripoli In a book both touching and humorous, he describes being abducted in Libya, listening to the sound of Kalashnikovs at night and talking to ordinary people struggling to get by On the second anniversary of the Arab Spring, this is the ideal time for this book.

    One thought on “A Tourist in the Arab Spring”

    1. Really somewhere between 3 and 4 stars, but I can't put my finger on why I didn't get into it fully? I've read the author before, liking his style, and he is funny here at times, so it's not that he's dull. Perhaps I'm just not all that into the Arab Spring background? If you are looking for that as a topic, by all means consider this one.

    2. This was a fabulous and heartbeat quickening read. This guy, first of all, is insane. He travels across Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt less than a year after the Arab Spring. But more importantly, I learned a lot about this part of the world! He makes Tunisians and Egyptians especially seem like such jovial, friendly, warm, and open people. Almost everyone he meets is eager to make conversation with him. I loved reading about the Roman ruins, incredible food and markets, museums, and people watching, [...]

    3. A well written and engaging travel book - although I wondered how wise the journey - across Tunisia, Libya and Egypt, soon after the Arab Spring. It gives a good insight into the impacts of revolution as well as the sites and people who live there. Whilst things will have changed greatly since, I still think worth a read.

    4. This book does what is says. It tells the time of a Times reporter who travels to North Africa shortly after the relatively recent uprisings when few tourists were daring to venture there. He starts in Tunisia, where the 'Arab Spring' started (in the winter, though), then manages to get into (barely) Libya, where he has to lie about his profession, as journalists are suspect even in post-Gaddafi days. Finally, he makes his way to Egypt. Chesshyre's account is honest and compelling, as he tries h [...]

    5. If you ever wanted to be convinced to go to North Africa, this is the book for you. His basic premise is that he's going to Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt right after the initial Arab Spring actions happened. But he's going as a tourist, looking for tourist spots. His description of the island of Djera (sp?) was enough to make me want to go. There are amazing Roman ruins in the area, and he makes all three countries sound fascinating, but really different. Is it great writing? No. Could you find this [...]

    6. I often had wondered what it might be like to be a tourist after the Arab Spring - and I thank Tom for having made the journey and explained to us what it was like for him. A brave traveler and a good travel writer. Let's hope the optimism he gained on that trip turns out to be well-founded.

    7. It kept me reading, but it could've been better - interesting nonetheless. Give it a go, especially if you're fascinated by somewhat atypical travel adventures.

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