The Hussaini Alam House

The Hussaini Alam House When nine year old Ayman arrives in Hyderabad in the early s to come and live at the Hussaini Alam House she little realizes that the house and its many inmates will come to haunt her life and

  • Title: The Hussaini Alam House
  • Author: Huma. R. Kidwai
  • ISBN: 9789381017098
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Paperback
  • When nine year old Ayman arrives in Hyderabad in the early 1950s to come and live at the Hussaini Alam House, she little realizes that the house, and its many inmates, will come to haunt her life and shape her destiny as she grows to become a woman The house is ruled over by her grandfather, a dignified despot, whom everyone but Ayman, her mother and sister, call Sarkar When nine year old Ayman arrives in Hyderabad in the early 1950s to come and live at the Hussaini Alam House, she little realizes that the house, and its many inmates, will come to haunt her life and shape her destiny as she grows to become a woman The house is ruled over by her grandfather, a dignified despot, whom everyone but Ayman, her mother and sister, call Sarkar master Her mother, the eternal rebel, is irreverent, progressive and a communist a bomb waiting to explode Ayman herself alternates between being the ugly duckling of the house and its little princess Huma Kidwai s sensitive and vivid portraits of the characters who teem around the House, offer a window into the customs and s of a traditional Hyderabadi Muslim family Narrated by the 40 year old Ayman as she recalls the events of her past, The Hussaini Alam House is an elegy to a vanished way of life, a lovesong to the people she has loved and lost, and a psychologically nuanced portrait of the women of the household as they tread a fine line between society s expectations and their own yearning for freedom.

    One thought on “The Hussaini Alam House”

    1. Once in a lifetime, we come across a story with which you can identify The Hussaini Alam House by Huma Kidwai is that story for me. After a long time, I read a book in one-sitting (well, if you do not count the 5-hour sleep I drifted into sobbing my heart out, after the chapter on Mummy). What a poignant story of women, where men exist on the periphery. I could identify the women I met in my lifetime with all the characters in this book. I relived my childhood at my paternal grandparents through [...]

    2. A raw and honest portrayal of the interpersonal dynamics of a Muslim family in 1960s Hyderabad. Not much in the way of plot but beautiful characterization! Also a pretty quick read.

    3. It is very difficult to write the review when you know the author personally. Huma's my teacher and I learnt from her the art of seeing a society through stories. But this isnt my only difficulty in reviewing the book. There is a greater difficulty. When I read the book and its opening lines" I am thickly populated inside. I carry all those who walked a little while with me."I knew it wasnt just her story, it was also mine. I didnot read the book. I wept with it. I felt it. I relieved my own pas [...]

    4. I loved this book. Written in the style of a memoir by a forty-something old Hyderabadi Muslim (elite) woman, through her recounting of the tales of all the women, from her great-garndmother to her two year old sibling, that live and pass through the old mansion in what was once an elite part of the city but had now fallen into decline and ultimately demolition to make way for the present. The author has woven such a rich tapestry of domestic and psychological details of the women's life that I [...]

    5. So many characters, yet such smooth transition between the chapters. The charm and warmth of joint families make one feel like going back to those good old days. On the other hand it's a great inspiration for Indian women to fight all odds to succeed in a male dominated society.

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