Circuits of the Wind: A Legend of the Net Age

Circuits of the Wind A Legend of the Net Age LITERARY FICTION AMERICAN LITERATUREThe Internet is everywhere now but Ray Valentine saw it first explode Circuits of the Wind an ambitious literary coming of age novel in three volumes is the very

  • Title: Circuits of the Wind: A Legend of the Net Age
  • Author: Michael Stutz
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 450
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • LITERARY FICTION AMERICAN LITERATUREThe Internet is everywhere now, but Ray Valentine saw it first explode.Circuits of the Wind, an ambitious literary coming of age novel in three volumes, is the very human story of Ray s quest to find himself as he grows up online, wandering the computer underground the wild, global outback that existed before the net went mainstream HLITERARY FICTION AMERICAN LITERATUREThe Internet is everywhere now, but Ray Valentine saw it first explode.Circuits of the Wind, an ambitious literary coming of age novel in three volumes, is the very human story of Ray s quest to find himself as he grows up online, wandering the computer underground the wild, global outback that existed before the net went mainstream How else does an end of century slacker reach out to the world from Sohola, that northern state that s a little Midwest than it is New England The net holds the key to what he s after but even as he pioneers this virtual world, the veneer of his real life begins to crack.This edition contains the complete, unabridged contents of all three paperback volumes.

    One thought on “Circuits of the Wind: A Legend of the Net Age”

    1. _Circuits of the Wind_ is a memorable take on the life of a technologist growing up in the 80s and 90s, but it's not a pop-history "hey, remember the" or a technical study of the era. This is lyrical prose, a long and flowing river of emotion that starts with Ray Valentine's childhood and drifts chronologically through his upbringing. It isn't the kind of heavily plotted coming-of-age tale you'd see adapted into a cheesy Hollywood movie, but it does follow a structure of Ray's formative years, w [...]

    2. I found this book very hard to read. At least twice I came very close to giving up on it. I strongly suspect it is, to some degree, autobiographical, so I wish to be delicate, but it will be difficult. I will admit that it is very possible that this style of book is simply not my cup of tea. It reads very much like a biography. I have nothing against biographies, but it usually only interests me because it is about a real person. This one is, supposedly, not. It is a narration of a boy's life fr [...]

    3. I read this in paperback where it was cut in three volumes, like Paul Murray's Skippy Dies. Like Murray this is literature, but more sensitive, less snark (and still just as funny). We are taken through the life of Ray Valentine as he discovers the internet. This happens in 700+ pages with little plot. But it moves fast, with touches at times of Richard Russo, Ethan Canin, even Dylan Thomas.

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