Celebrated Cases of Dick Tracy

Celebrated Cases of Dick Tracy The early s witnessed the emergence of the action and suspense comic strips such as Tarzan and Buck Rogers In Chester Gould a journeyman newspaper artist submitted samples of a new cartoon

  • Title: Celebrated Cases of Dick Tracy
  • Author: Chester Gould
  • ISBN: 9780517350867
  • Page: 294
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The early 1930 s witnessed the emergence of the action and suspense comic strips such as Tarzan and Buck Rogers In 1931 Chester Gould, a journeyman newspaper artist submitted samples of a new cartoon strip featuring a city detective to Captain Joseph Patterson, head of the Chicago Tribune New York News Syndicate Captain Patterson bought the idea, changing the name ofThe early 1930 s witnessed the emergence of the action and suspense comic strips such as Tarzan and Buck Rogers In 1931 Chester Gould, a journeyman newspaper artist submitted samples of a new cartoon strip featuring a city detective to Captain Joseph Patterson, head of the Chicago Tribune New York News Syndicate Captain Patterson bought the idea, changing the name of the strip from Plainclothes Tracy to Dick Tracy and a new era of realism hit the cartoon page.On Sunday, October 4, 1931 Dick Tracy appeared for the first time in the Detroit Mirror, and now after almost four decades it is still followed intently by millions of readers throughout the world Tracy, a detective in a large American city that might possibly be Chicago, is assisted in his early career by the ever faithful Pat Patton now Police Chief and his adopted, often kidnapped, son Junior With this help, the eagle beaked, square chinned lawman is than a match for the gangsters, blackmailers, murderers, swindlers, and spies that continually plague the public.The murder of Tess Trueheart s father spurs Tracy to join Chief Brandon s plainclothes department One action filled month later, Ribs Mocco is brought to justic Behind Ribs Mocco lurks Big Boy and anybody who remembers Chicago in the early 30 s knows who that refers to , and Tracy continues the pursuit He has found his life s workE CELEBRATED CASES OF DICK TRACY 1931 1951 is a collection of episodes featuring the most notorious criminals of this period Ribs Mocco The Blank, a faceless killer a midget lawyer Jerome Trohs and Mamma Little Face Finny The Mole, who naturally lives underground B B Eyes, a tire bootlegger yes, kids, there were such things piano player 88 Keyes and Nellie, an early groupie Flattop, a killer for hire The Summer Sisters, May and June The Brow, a spy Breathless Mahoney, a stepdaughter of Shaky Mumbles, a singer who in 1947 launched the fad of unintelligible enunciation that continues today Pear Shape, a swindler in the weight reducing field and last, but far from least, these two inspired creations, Gravel Gertie and B.O Plenty.

    One thought on “Celebrated Cases of Dick Tracy”

    1. Re-reading Chester Gould's classic Dick Tracy stories gives you some sense of how really twisted the crime literature of the 1930's really was. Gould's decisive line work is expressive and dynamic, his characters -- especially the villains -- bloodthirsty and vivid. The names are vivid enough: Flattop, 88 Keys, The Brow, The Mole, Little Face. Dick Tracy's colorful Rogue's Gallery falls somewhere between The Sopranos and Batman in terms of sheer grotesque.When you read these stories the photos o [...]

    2. Surprising in a lot of ways. My general pop-culture knowledge tells me that Dick Tracy was mostly about bizarre villains and gangsters, but it was really a police procedural series, which simultaneously follows villains and heroes. Anyway, the whole thing feels surprisingly fresh for a set of comic strips 60 years old. There are a lot of coincidences and weird happenings, but that sort of stuff is pretty standard in a serial. Invariably, although I'm not particularly going to seek out the Comple [...]

    3. So much to like here. These strips are much darker and more violent than I imagined they might be. Dick Tracy and his compatriots are not very interesting or complex - the real meat and potatoes of this strip are the villains, grotesquely distorted in body/face and soul, ruthless, and ultimately doomed. The art is sort of clumsy in places, but I think that's mostly to do with the amount of plot and dialogue that has to be crammed into the standard tiny four-panel format.

    4. The good-old days are often type-cast as a kinder, gentler time. Thankfully, Dick Tracy was anything but. It would be decades before comics would overcome the comics code to once again deal with gritty subject matter as well as Dick Tracy did.

    5. I stumbled upon this book many years ago at a little library in Wayne, Nebraska. I can't tell you how many times I checked it out. Probably the only library book that was ever in danger of me stealing it. And now I kind of wish I had stolen it.

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